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In the News: Jennifer Karas Montez

Karas Montez study examines educational disparities in US adult health

Jennifer Karas Montez, Mark D. Hayward & Anna Zajacova
March 12, 2019

Life Expectancy is Increasingly Tied to Our Education Level

Jennifer Karas Montez

In the U.S., an individual’s education level is one of the strongest predictors of how long they will live. Since the mid-1980s, it has become an increasingly strong predictor. This is true for women and men and for different race and ethnic groups.

March 5, 2019

Maxwell faculty secure RWJF grant to study preemption effect on health

 The team, which includes Doug Wolf, professor of public administration and international affairs, Shannon Monnat, associate professor of sociology, and Jennifer Karas Montez, professor of sociology, will explore pre-emption’s effect on geographic inequities in health, focusing on labor and environmental policies.

January 17, 2019

Karas Montez study on educational disparities, mortality published

Jennifer Karas Montez, Anna Zajacova, Mark D. Hayward, Steven H. Woolf, Derek Chapman & Jason Beckfield
January 11, 2019

See related: Education, Longevity

Karas Montez addresses education, health disparities at ASA meeting

Educational disparities in U.S. adult health are the focus of a presentation by a Maxwell School professor at the 2018 Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association (ASA) in Philadelphia.
August 21, 2018

New edition of Maxwell Perspective features alumni journalists

The spring edition of Maxwell Perspective, now being mailed to alumni and other friends of the School, contains a cover-story focus on journalism’s role the functioning of a healthy American democracy.  Reflection on that topic is provided by prominent national journalists who received a degree from Maxwell
August 8, 2018

Where You Live

“Our life expectancy is increasingly being shaped by where we live in the U.S.,” says Jennifer Karas Montez, Gerald B. Cramer Faculty Scholar of Aging Studies at Maxwell. It’s tempting to blame lifestyle-related behaviors, but “lifestyle behaviors are not root causes. They are symptoms of the environment and the social and economic deprivation that many parts of the country endure, thanks to decades of policy decisions.”

August 8, 2018

Karas Montez paper on health/education disparity published in Scientia

Mark D. Howard & Jennifer Karas Montez
July 3, 2018

See related: Education

Maxwell announces promotions, tenure for eight faculty

The Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University is pleased to announce the promotion of the following distinguished individuals to professor in their field. 
June 18, 2018

Karas Montez discusses college major, future health on KJZZ Radio

Jennifer Karas Montez, professor of sociology and Gerald B. Cramer Faculty Scholar of Aging Studies, was interviewed on KJZZ Radio for the segment "What Does Your College Major Say About Your Future Health?" Karas Montez discussed her recent research study that found physical health in mid-life differs greatly depending on college major.
June 12, 2018

Maxwell celebrates graduates, faculty at Commencement Weekend 2018

Commencement weekend for graduates of the Maxwell School at Syracuse University began on Friday, May 11 in Hendricks Chapel with Maxwell’s 2018 Graduate Convocation honoring Master’s and doctoral degree candidates across the school’s scholarly and professional programs.
May 18, 2018

See related: Student Experience

Karas Montez awarded prestigious Carnegie Fellowship

Jennifer Karas Montez, the Gerald B. Cramer Faculty Scholar in Aging Studies in the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs of Syracuse University, has been named a 2018 Andrew Carnegie Fellow, the most generous and prestigious fellowship in the social sciences and humanities.
April 25, 2018

Karas Montez paper on college major, health cited in Pacific Standard

A research study co-authored by Jennifer Karas Montez, Gerald B. Cramer Faculty Scholar of Aging Studies, was referenced in the Pacific Standard article, "Your College Major Predicts Midlife Health." "Compared to adults who majored in one of the most health-advantaged fields—business—adults majoring in some fields, such as psychology/social work and law/public policy, have nearly twice the odds of poor health," reports the research team led by Karas Montez. 
January 12, 2018

Karas Montez research cited in Chronicle article on health, education

A 2014 research study on education and mortality among U.S. adults, co-authored by Jennifer Karas Montez, Gerald B. Cramer Faculty Scholar of Aging Studies, was cited in the Chronicle of Higher Education article, "Why Education Matters to Your Health." 
January 3, 2018

Karas Montez explains how the tax plan attacks education in Huffington Post

"The Assault On Our Education System In The House And Senate Tax Plans Will Literally Kill," written by Jennifer Karas Montez, the Gerald B. Cramer Faculty Scholar of Aging Studies, was published in the Huffington Post. "The House bill will devastate higher education by taxing graduate students on the cost of their tuition," says Karas Montez. "Both bills also undermine K-12 education by funneling money away from public school and into private ones" 
December 6, 2017

Colleen Heflin examines the intersection of food security, welfare policy and health

"Typically people who qualify for higher SNAP benefits are in the worst health, so this suggests there is something really protective about the SNAP benefits," says Colleen Heflin, professor of public administration and international affairs.

October 5, 2017

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