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Filtered by: Water

Koch Discusses Arizona’s Water Shortage, the Role of Saudi Agribusiness With Al-Monitor, The World

“The (Saudi) government is very aware of the unsustainable agriculture practices that lead to a situation where the groundwater is no longer really able to sustain any substantial commercial agriculture,”  says Natalie Koch, professor of geography and the environment.

October 9, 2023

Pralle Quoted in ABC 7 Chicago Article on Flooding in Cook County

"We're getting lots of intense rain in short periods of time. And that just means that a lot of the drainage systems in cities, especially with old sort of infrastructure, can't handle that amount of runoff in that quick of a time," says Sarah Pralle, associate professor of political science.

October 5, 2023

Mallon Andrews Talks to Science News About Climate Change and the Color of Seawater

Some colors can affect divers’ physical and mental health, says Kyrstin Mallon Andrews, assistant professor of anthropology. For instance, because yellow water clouds the water’s surface, the fishermen must dive continually to see fish, an exhausting process. Yellow water also causes skin rashes and debilitating ear infections, along with “sort of generalized angst,” she says.

September 6, 2023

The Colour of Seawater: Colour Perception and Environmental Change in Dominican Seascapes

Kyrstin Mallon Andrews

"The Colour of Seawater: Colour Perception and Environmental Change in Dominican Seascapes," authored by Assistant Professor of Anthropology Kyrstin Mallon Andrews, was published in the Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute.

August 30, 2023

Sultana Quoted in ScienceAlert Article on Rising Sea Levels

"This can't continue as systems that become more unstable and unpredictable will harm more in chaotic ways," says Farhana Sultana, professor of geography and the environment.

July 11, 2023

Koch Quoted in The Hill Article on Saudi Arabian Alfalfa Farms in Arizona

“If they [Saudi Arabia] want to be able to guarantee their population food security, they know that they can’t really do that domestically,” says Natalie Koch, professor of geography and the environment. The Arizonan land was particularly appealing to the kingdom “because you can get more bang for your buck when you buy that farm,” says Koch.

May 10, 2023

Koch Discusses Saudi Arabian Farms Using Water From Arizona and California in KUSA Article

“If you can invest the capital to drill a deep well that can get deep into the groundwater supply, then you can really pump as much as you want,” says Natalie Koch, professor of geography and the environment. “This was appealing to the Saudis as well to go [to La Paz County], where they’re not being charged for water they extract because there’s no measuring of it.”

April 29, 2023

Koch Weighs in on Western States Banning Foreign Groundwater Use in Stateline Article

“The U.S. has always been promoting and setting up this entire thing,” says Natalie Koch, professor of geography and the environment. “It’s not like the Americans are passive in this. We have absolutely helped sow the seeds for that Saudi agricultural industry that has come back to us now.”

March 16, 2023

Koch Talks to KTVK About Arizona’s Outdated Water Law

Natalie Koch, professor of geography and the environment, argues that state lawmakers need to update the state’s 43 year old water law and create more active management areas to regulate water use across Arizona. “There needs to be some way of monitoring and regulating who is drawing what from the aquifers,” says Koch.

February 21, 2023

See related: United States, Water

Koch Article on Arizona Depleting its Groundwater Supply Published in New York Times

“Pumping groundwater in Arizona remains largely unregulated,” writes Natalie Koch, professor of geography. “It’s this legal failing that, in part, allows the Saudi company to draw unlimited amounts of water to grow an alfalfa crop that feeds dairy cows 8,000 miles away.”

January 10, 2023

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