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Taylor Speaks With Fox, Newsweek, WWL Radio About the Ongoing War in Ukraine

"I thought the Russian invasion two years ago would have been more successful. I thought Russia would have managed to seize and hold more territory than they did. ...That’s because Russia fought worse than I thought they would and Ukraine has fought much better," says Brian Taylor, director of the Moynihan Institute of Global Affairs.

February 27, 2024

Taylor Speaks With Forbes and WABC About the Death of Russian Opposition Leader Alexei Navalny

"We don’t know every detail about the circumstances of his death today, but it is 100 percent fair to say that Alexei Navalny was killed by Vladimir Putin and the Russian state," says Brian Taylor, professor of political science and director of the Moynihan Institute of Global Affairs.

February 21, 2024

Taylor Quoted in La Presse Article on a Clash Between NATO and Russia

"He [Putin] could get drunk on his success, conclude that the West is just a paper tiger and decide to push further to see what happens," says Brian Taylor, professor of political science and director of the Moynihan Institute of Global Affairs.

February 10, 2024

Catherine Herrold Receives Award to Study Locally Led Development in Serbia

The associate professor will analyze how Serbians organize for social change at the local level.

February 9, 2024

Taylor Comments on Declining Human Rights in Russia in Forbes Article

“Russia doesn't have real elections most of all because it's basically illegal to be an opposition politician or activist or independent journalist anymore, not just because of manipulating rules at election time,” says Brian Taylor, professor of political science.

January 30, 2024

Sultana Discusses the Feedback Loops Between War and Fossil Fuels in Atmos Article

“The control of oil and gas resources has been a key factor in many conflicts and geopolitical imperialism, either by providing part of the motivation for an invasion or by helping countries fund their militaries,” says Farhana Sultana, professor of geography and the environment. “Conflict, in turn, feeds production by driving up oil and gas prices,” she adds.

January 26, 2024

Research by Sultana Cited in Scientific American Article on Extreme Weather, Long-Term Health

Women in Bangladesh suffer disproportionately during floods, as Farhana Sultana, professor of geography and the environment, has documented in a study, in part because they bear the brunt of responsibility for managing water and food for their household, as well as taking care of their children.

January 4, 2024

Taylor Weighs In on President Putin’s Announcement That He Will Run Again in RFE/RL Article

"Everyone knew this was coming and the only questions were when and how exactly the announcement would be made," says Brian Taylor, professor of political science. "Usually, things like this don’t happen by accident in Russian politics," he says.
December 20, 2023

See related: Elections, Government, Russia

Sultana Discusses the UN Climate Change Conference (COP28) with BBC Newshour, CBC Radio, NY Times

"One of the challenges that's coming out of the COP is a focus on language rather than actual politics," says Farhana Sultana, professor of geography and the environment. "So we can talk about abated/unabated [fossil fuels], whether there's possibilities for different forms of use, which source it's coming from. But I think what we really need to focus on is the overall production."

December 13, 2023

Huber Weighs In on Biden’s Absence at the COP28 Climate Change Conference in RM.id Article

"President Biden promised a 'whole of government' approach to the climate crisis after taking office. But his absence at the COP28 meeting signals a lack of interest in the dangers of the ongoing climate crisis. Given that the United States is the world's largest emitter, this should be an international scandal," says Matthew Huber, professor of geography and the environment.

December 1, 2023

Sultana Discusses Carbon Inequality With BBC News Brasil and The Guardian

“Carbon inequality is effectively a colonisation of the atmosphere by the capitalist elite of the planet through hyper-consumption and pollution, while the cost of that climate coloniality is borne disproportionately by the marginalised and vulnerable communities in developing countries,” says Farhana Sultana, professor of geography and the environment.

November 29, 2023

See related: Climate Change, Colonialism

How Citizens Want to ‘See’ the State: Exploring the Relationship between Transparency, Public Values

Sabina Schnell, Jiho Kim, Greg Munno, Tina Nabatchi

"How Citizens Want to ‘See’ the State: Exploring the Relationship between Transparency and Public Values," co-authored by Professors Sabina Schnell and Tina Nabatchi, along with Ph.D. student Jiho Kim, was published in Public Administration Review.

November 20, 2023

See related: Government, United States

Purser Weighs In on Why Hospital Workers and Pharmacists Are Striking in BBC Article

"Pharmacy workers at CVS or Walgreens have been saddled with this exacerbation of workplace duties without a corollary growth of staffing," says Gretchen Purser, associate professor of sociology. "They feel very overwhelmed, very overburdened, very overworked. And none of that has come along with increased wages, either."

November 14, 2023

See related: Income, Labor, United States

Huber Discusses the Build Public Renewables Act in Public Power Review Articles

In his two-part essay on the Build Public Renewables Act (BPRA), Professor of Geography and the Environment Matthew Huber examines the labor question and assesses dubious campaign claims that BPRA is a climate victory.

November 13, 2023

McCormick Article on Drug Cartels, US and Mexico Politics Published in Dallas Morning News

“We are entering contentious electoral cycles on both sides of the border, with voters going to the ballot box in June 2024 in Mexico and November 2024 for the U.S. The scourge of drug trafficking and ineffective government responses to organized crime will figure prominently in stump speeches,” writes Gladys McCormick, Jay and Debe Moskowitz Endowed Chair in Mexico-U.S. Relations.

November 11, 2023

To Know Is To Act? Revisiting the Impact of Government Transparency on Corruption

Sabina Schnell

 “To Know Is To Act? Revisiting the Impact of Government Transparency on Corruption,” authored by Sabina Schnell, assistant professor of public administration and international affairs, was published in Public Administration and Development.

November 10, 2023

Buzard Talks to CBC Radio About Her Research on Parental Involvement

"So many of the calls come to them [mothers], even though they're in kind of very demanding jobs [and] they've told the schools to call their children's fathers," says Kristy Buzard, associate professor of economics.

November 6, 2023

Sultana Discusses COP28 Conference, Death of Climate Champion Saleemul Huq in The Guardian, France24

“As the world prepares for COP28, the onus is on global leaders, corporations and individuals to rise to the occasion and champion the cause of climate justice. Wealthy nations must start putting real funding towards loss and damage, while ramping up their mitigation and adaptation efforts, and reining in the influence of the fossil fuel industry in climate policies,” Farhana Sultana, professor of geography and the environment, writes in The Guardian.

November 3, 2023

Huber Weighs In on the Latest Victory in the United Auto Workers Strike in El País Article

Matthew Huber, professor of geography and the environment, calls the outcome of the strike a huge victory for the United Auto Workers and its workers. “It shows that when workers harness their collective power through strikes, they can force employers to give in to workers’ ambitious demands,” he says.

November 2, 2023

See related: Income, Labor, United States

Rutherford Quoted in PolitiFact Article on Shift to Electric Vehicles

If the (Biden) administration does not incentivize an electric transition, it means the U.S. will cede EV [electric vehicle] leadership to China," says Tod Rutherford, professor of geography and the environment. "The Europeans are very alarmed by this and especially the German manufacturers are scrambling to catch up."

October 30, 2023

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IIAS Study Group on 'Coproduction of Public Services'

Greenberg House, Washington, DC

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This will be the fifth meeting of the IIAS Study Group on 'Coproduction of Public Services.'  Our aim is to create and nurture an intellectual platform for the theoretical and empirical study of coproduction and its implications for the organization and management of public services. The conference will take place at the Syracuse University Greenberg House, which is located at 2301 Calvert Street NW, Washington, DC 20008.  The telephone number there is 202.797.4678.  It is located on the corner of Calvert Street and Woodley Place in the Woodley Park area of northwest Washington, DC.  Click here for more information.    


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Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration
400 Eggers Hall