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Against “Democratizing AI”

Johannes Himmelreich

"Against 'Democratizing AI'," authored by Johannes Himmelreich, assistant professor of public administration and international affairs, was published in AI & Society: Knowledge, Culture and Communication.

January 24, 2024

Localizing Democracy Promotion: Seven Steps to Transforming U.S. Democracy Assistance

Catherine E. Herrold, PhD
This policy brief argues that U.S. strategies to promote democracy have been largely unsuccessful because they misinterpret local understandings of what democracy means, and they overlook local organizations.
December 18, 2023

The Politics of the Gender Gap in COVID-19: Partisanship, Health Behavior, and Policy Preferences in the US

Colleen Dougherty Burton, Shana Kushner Gadarian, Sara Wallace Goodman, Thomas B. Pepinsky

"The Politics of the Gender Gap in COVID-19: Partisanship, Health Behavior, and Policy Preferences in the US," co-authored by Shana Gadarian, professor and chair of political science, was published in the Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law.

December 6, 2023

Black Women Taught Us: An Intimate History of Black Feminism

Jenn M. Jackson

Jenn M. Jackson, assistant professor of political science, has written “Black Women Taught Us: An Intimate History of Black Feminism” (Random House Press, 2024).

November 20, 2023

How Citizens Want to ‘See’ the State: Exploring the Relationship between Transparency and Public Values

Sabina Schnell, Jiho Kim, Greg Munno, Tina Nabatchi

"How Citizens Want to ‘See’ the State: Exploring the Relationship between Transparency and Public Values," co-authored by Professors Sabina Schnell and Tina Nabatchi, along with Ph.D. student Jiho Kim, was published in Public Administration Review.

November 20, 2023

See related: Government, United States

Emotion and Political Psychology

Shana Kushner Gadarian, Ted Brader

Shana Gadarian, professor and chair of political science, co-authored a chapter in the Oxford Handbook of Political Psychology 3rd Edition titled "Emotion and Political Psychology."

September 21, 2023

Action anthropology and public policy change: Lead poisoning in Syracuse, NY

Sandra D. Lane, Robert A. Rubinstein, Occeana Fair, Katie Farkouh, Melaica Delgado, Tanya S. McGee, Kinley Gaudette, Paul Ciavarri, Maureen Thompson, Md Koushik Ahmed

"Action anthropology and public policy change: Lead poisoning in Syracuse, NY," co-authored by Distinguished Professor of Anthropology Robert Rubinstein, was published in the Annals of Anthropological Practice.

September 19, 2023

Like-Minded Sources on Facebook Are Prevalent but Not Polarizing

Brendan Nyhan, Jaime Settle, Emily Thorson, Magdalena Wojcieszak, et al.

"Like-minded sources on Facebook are prevalent but not polarizing," co-authored by Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Thorson, was published in Nature. The study is focused on the prevalence and effects of "echo chambers" on social media.

July 27, 2023

Racial Resentment and Support for COVID-19 Travel Bans in the United States

Shana Kushner Gadarian, Sara Wallace Goodman, Thomas Pepinsky

"Racial resentment and support for COVID-19 travel bans in the United States," co-authored by Professor and Chair of Political Science Shana Gadarian was published in Political Science Research and Methods.

May 31, 2023

Democracies in America: Keywords for the Nineteenth Century and Today

Mark Schmeller

Associate Professor of History Mark Schmeller's article, titled "Public Opinion," was included in "Democracies in America: Keywords for the Nineteenth Century and Today" (Oxford University Press, 2023).

April 13, 2023

See related: United States

The Constitution’s Penman: Gouverneur Morris and the Creation of America’s Basic Charter

Dennis Rasmussen

Dennis Rasmussen, professor of political science, has written “The Constitution’s Penman: Gouverneur Morris and the Creation of America’s Basic Charter” (University Press of Kansas, 2023). 

March 17, 2023

See related: Government, United States

Women and the Common Life: Love, Marriage, and Feminism

Elisabeth Lasch-Quinn, editor
February 22, 2023

Attitudes about Refugees and Immigrants Arriving in the United States: A Conjoint Experiment

Liza G. Steele, Lamis Abdelaaty, Nga Than

"Attitudes about Refugees and Immigrants Arriving in the United States: A Conjoint Experiment," authored by Associate Professor of Political Science Lamis Abdelaaty, was published in Ethnic and Racial Studies.

January 13, 2023

See related: Refugees, United States

Minority Rights, Governing Regimes, or Secular Elites: Who Benefits from the Protection of Religious and Anti-Religious Speech by the U.S. Supreme Court and European Court of Human Rights?

Nathan T. Carrington , Thomas M. Keck, Claire Sigsworth

"Minority Rights, Governing Regimes, or Secular Elites: Who Benefits from the Protection of Religious and Anti-Religious Speech by the U.S. Supreme Court and European Court of Human Rights?," co-authored by Maxwell alum Nathan Carrington, Professor of Political Science Thomas Keck and political science Ph.D. student Claire Sigsworth, was published in the Journal of Law and Courts.

December 21, 2022

Misperceptions about Refugee Policy

Lamis Abdelaaty, Emily Thorson

"Misperceptions about Refugee Policy," co-authored by political science professors Lamis Abdelaaty and Emily Thorson, was published in American Political Science Review.

October 20, 2022

See related: Refugees, United States

Pandemic Politics: The Deadly Toll of Partisanship in the Age of COVID

Shana Kushner Gadarian, Sara Wallace Goodman, Thomas B. Pepinsky

“Pandemic Politics: The Deadly Toll of Partisanship in the Age of COVID," co-authored by Professor of Political Science Shana Kushner Gadarian, draws on a wealth of new data on public opinion to show how pandemic politics has touched all aspects of Americans’ lives.

October 18, 2022

Enforcing Gender at the Polls: Transing Voters and Women’s Suffrage before the American Civil War

Andrew Wender Cohen, Carol Faulkner

Between 1800 and 1860, individuals deemed female by society donned male attire, represented themselves as men, and tried unlawfully to vote, thus challenging the gender binary at the foundation of U.S. democracy. The history of their confrontation with an electoral system reserved for men suggests a more porous and inclusive history of gender and citizenship before the Civil War.

September 26, 2022

Toward a More Strategic View of Strategic Planning Research

John M. Bryson, Lauren Hamilton Edwards, David M. Van Slyke
September 14, 2022

Historical Information and Beliefs about Racial Inequality

Steven White, Albert H. Fang

"Historical information and beliefs about racial inequality," co-authored by Assistant Professor of Political Science Steven White was published in Policies, Groups, and Identities.

August 12, 2022

The SAGE Handbook of Social Studies in Health and Medicine

Edited by Susan C. Scrimshaw, Sandra D. Lane, Robert A. Rubinstein, Julian Fisher

Faculty members Robert Rubinstein and Sandra Lane are among the co-editors and contributors to this handbook, which investigates the social contexts of health—including food and nutrition, race, class, ethnicity, trauma, gender, mental illness and the environment—to explain the complicated nature of illness. 

June 2, 2022

Campbell Public Affairs Institute
306 Eggers Hall