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Sultana Discusses the UN Climate Change Conference (COP28) with BBC Newshour, CBC Radio, NY Times

"One of the challenges that's coming out of the COP is a focus on language rather than actual politics," says Farhana Sultana, professor of geography and the environment. "So we can talk about abated/unabated [fossil fuels], whether there's possibilities for different forms of use, which source it's coming from. But I think what we really need to focus on is the overall production."

December 13, 2023

Huber Weighs In on Biden’s Absence at the COP28 Climate Change Conference in RM.id Article

"President Biden promised a 'whole of government' approach to the climate crisis after taking office. But his absence at the COP28 meeting signals a lack of interest in the dangers of the ongoing climate crisis. Given that the United States is the world's largest emitter, this should be an international scandal," says Matthew Huber, professor of geography and the environment.

December 1, 2023

Sultana Discusses Carbon Inequality With BBC News Brasil and The Guardian

“Carbon inequality is effectively a colonisation of the atmosphere by the capitalist elite of the planet through hyper-consumption and pollution, while the cost of that climate coloniality is borne disproportionately by the marginalised and vulnerable communities in developing countries,” says Farhana Sultana, professor of geography and the environment.

November 29, 2023

See related: Climate Change, Colonialism

How Citizens Want to ‘See’ the State: Exploring the Relationship between Transparency, Public Values

Sabina Schnell, Jiho Kim, Greg Munno, Tina Nabatchi

"How Citizens Want to ‘See’ the State: Exploring the Relationship between Transparency and Public Values," co-authored by Professors Sabina Schnell and Tina Nabatchi, along with Ph.D. student Jiho Kim, was published in Public Administration Review.

November 20, 2023

See related: Government, United States

Purser Weighs In on Why Hospital Workers and Pharmacists Are Striking in BBC Article

"Pharmacy workers at CVS or Walgreens have been saddled with this exacerbation of workplace duties without a corollary growth of staffing," says Gretchen Purser, associate professor of sociology. "They feel very overwhelmed, very overburdened, very overworked. And none of that has come along with increased wages, either."

November 14, 2023

See related: Income, Labor, United States

Huber Discusses the Build Public Renewables Act in Public Power Review Articles

In his two-part essay on the Build Public Renewables Act (BPRA), Professor of Geography and the Environment Matthew Huber examines the labor question and assesses dubious campaign claims that BPRA is a climate victory.

November 13, 2023

McCormick Article on Drug Cartels, US and Mexico Politics Published in Dallas Morning News

“We are entering contentious electoral cycles on both sides of the border, with voters going to the ballot box in June 2024 in Mexico and November 2024 for the U.S. The scourge of drug trafficking and ineffective government responses to organized crime will figure prominently in stump speeches,” writes Gladys McCormick, Jay and Debe Moskowitz Endowed Chair in Mexico-U.S. Relations.

November 11, 2023

To Know Is To Act? Revisiting the Impact of Government Transparency on Corruption

Sabina Schnell

 “To Know Is To Act? Revisiting the Impact of Government Transparency on Corruption,” authored by Sabina Schnell, assistant professor of public administration and international affairs, was published in Public Administration and Development.

November 10, 2023

Buzard Talks to CBC Radio About Her Research on Parental Involvement

"So many of the calls come to them [mothers], even though they're in kind of very demanding jobs [and] they've told the schools to call their children's fathers," says Kristy Buzard, associate professor of economics.

November 6, 2023

Sultana Discusses COP28 Conference, Death of Climate Champion Saleemul Huq in The Guardian, France24

“As the world prepares for COP28, the onus is on global leaders, corporations and individuals to rise to the occasion and champion the cause of climate justice. Wealthy nations must start putting real funding towards loss and damage, while ramping up their mitigation and adaptation efforts, and reining in the influence of the fossil fuel industry in climate policies,” Farhana Sultana, professor of geography and the environment, writes in The Guardian.

November 3, 2023

Huber Weighs In on the Latest Victory in the United Auto Workers Strike in El País Article

Matthew Huber, professor of geography and the environment, calls the outcome of the strike a huge victory for the United Auto Workers and its workers. “It shows that when workers harness their collective power through strikes, they can force employers to give in to workers’ ambitious demands,” he says.

November 2, 2023

See related: Income, Labor, United States

Rutherford Quoted in PolitiFact Article on Shift to Electric Vehicles

If the (Biden) administration does not incentivize an electric transition, it means the U.S. will cede EV [electric vehicle] leadership to China," says Tod Rutherford, professor of geography and the environment. "The Europeans are very alarmed by this and especially the German manufacturers are scrambling to catch up."

October 30, 2023

Rutherford Talks to Barron’s, Christian Science Monitor About the UAW Strike

“There is a very different kind of spirit right now” in the UAW, Tod Rutherford, professor of geography and the environment, tells Christian Science Monitor. “People are just saying, ‘That’s enough. We’ve got to do something, make a stand.’”

October 6, 2023

See related: Income, Labor, United States

Maxwell Sociologists Honored and Elected to Leadership Positions at ASA Annual Meeting

Prema Kurien and Janet M. Wilmoth received awards, and several faculty colleagues were elected to roles in the American Sociological Association. 

October 4, 2023

Huber Discusses the Climate Class War in UnHerd Article

"Rather than tackling the problem of who owns and controls fossil-fuel based production (a relative minority of society), carbon behaviouralism aims its sights on the “irresponsible” choices of millions of consumers of all classes," writes Matt Huber, professor of geography and the environment.

October 3, 2023

Kristy Buzard Explores Gender Disparities in Economics

She is part of a three-member team that received a $157,065 grant from the Women in Economics and Mathematics Research Consortium.

September 28, 2023

Rutherford Talks to Marketplace About the United Auto Workers Strike

When automakers faced bankruptcy in 2008, auto workers faced a tough decision: lose jobs or agree to contract changes that would help the companies get a federal bailout. The union chose the latter. “This was a concession they had to make in order to sustain the bailouts and have some kind of recovery,” says Tod Rutherford, professor of geography and the environment.

September 25, 2023

See related: Income, Labor, United States

Huber Weighs In on United Auto Workers Strike in The Hill

“The UAW…strike action is ultimately trying to realize one of the Biden Administration’s core policy goals and political selling points: you can have good, family-sustaining union jobs alongside climate action. The problem is the automakers see EV production as a way to trim labor costs and shift production to non-union plants,” says Matt Huber, professor of geography and the environment.

September 19, 2023

Action anthropology and public policy change: Lead poisoning in Syracuse, NY

Sandra D. Lane, Robert A. Rubinstein, Occeana Fair, Katie Farkouh, Melaica Delgado, Tanya S. McGee, Kinley Gaudette, Paul Ciavarri, Maureen Thompson, Md Koushik Ahmed

"Action anthropology and public policy change: Lead poisoning in Syracuse, NY," co-authored by Distinguished Professor of Anthropology Robert Rubinstein, was published in the Annals of Anthropological Practice.

September 19, 2023

Taylor Speaks with CBC News, International Business Times About the Prigozhin Plane Crash

Brian Taylor, professor of political science, says that he believes Prigozhin is dead and he agrees with Biden. "Putin made clear at the time he saw the mutiny as 'treason' and 'a stab in the back,' which he was unlikely to forget or forgive," he says.

September 1, 2023

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Conflict Management Center Workshop- Basic Training 1: Conflict Styles and Reflective Listening and Train the Trainer Session

204 Maxwell Hall

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The Conflict Management Center will begin its training workshop series this fall. Our first workshop, "Basic Training 1: Conflict Styles and Reflective Listening and Train the Trainer Session" is scheduled for Saturday, September 9, 2017, from 9am to 3pm, in 204 Maxwell (See below for description). Breakfast and light lunch will be served!


Registration is open to the SU community and the public! Please fill out this form or send an email indicating name, status, dept/organization, and dietary restriction to cmc@syr.edu.
Event Description: Each CMC workshop provides theory-based content and practice-proven skills, providing participants with both a foundation and a springboard for building his or her personal and professional capacities in conflict transformation and group facilitation. The Basic Training workshop is composed of two parts:


9 a.m.-1 p.m.: Basic Training Part 1: Conflict Styles and Reflective Listening 
What kind of conflict style do you have? How does it impact the way in which you deal with conflict? Understanding the various conflict styles can help bridge understanding in how you and others react to conflict. Also learn a powerful tool that can help deal with emotions associated with interpersonal conflict- reflective listening. RL helps address these high emotions in order to allow 'room' to address the conflict. Add these two 'tools' to your conflict management toolbox in an interactive, participatory workshop format.

1 p.m.-3:30 p.m.: Train the Trainer: First Year Forum 
This session, which will be held immediately after Basic Training Part 1, will train interested volunteers who attend the morning session on being a CMC Associate for SU's First Year Forum (FYF) and other workshops throughout the academic year. The FYF initiative helps freshmen gain the knowledge and skills for a more successful college career. It involves small groups of freshmen who meet with a faculty member on a regular basis on a variety of topics. One of the options for FYF is an approximately 1-hour workshop on the basics of conflict management- and the requests are already pouring in! We will cover everything you need to know in order to be a trainer using this CMC-developed curriculum.


Prof. Catherine Gerard, Director of the Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration (PARCC) at Maxwell School, Syracuse University, will be leading both workshops. 


Please sign up for our Conflict Management Center listserv to stay informed of CMC workshops and events (type "SUBSCRIBE CONFLICTMANAGEMENTCTR" and your name in the body of the message).  You can also contact us via email. 


If you require accommodations, please contact CMC Director, Carolina Arango-Vargas 

Email: carangov@syr.edu Telephone: (315) 443-2934 (Monday-Wednesday)

 


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Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration
400 Eggers Hall