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Huber Discusses the Build Public Renewables Act in Public Power Review Articles

In his two-part essay on the Build Public Renewables Act (BPRA), Professor of Geography and the Environment Matthew Huber examines the labor question and assesses dubious campaign claims that BPRA is a climate victory.

November 13, 2023

McCormick Article on Drug Cartels, US and Mexico Politics Published in Dallas Morning News

“We are entering contentious electoral cycles on both sides of the border, with voters going to the ballot box in June 2024 in Mexico and November 2024 for the U.S. The scourge of drug trafficking and ineffective government responses to organized crime will figure prominently in stump speeches,” writes Gladys McCormick, Jay and Debe Moskowitz Endowed Chair in Mexico-U.S. Relations.

November 11, 2023

To Know Is To Act? Revisiting the Impact of Government Transparency on Corruption

Sabina Schnell

 “To Know Is To Act? Revisiting the Impact of Government Transparency on Corruption,” authored by Sabina Schnell, assistant professor of public administration and international affairs, was published in Public Administration and Development.

November 10, 2023

Buzard Talks to CBC Radio About Her Research on Parental Involvement

"So many of the calls come to them [mothers], even though they're in kind of very demanding jobs [and] they've told the schools to call their children's fathers," says Kristy Buzard, associate professor of economics.

November 6, 2023

Sultana Discusses COP28 Conference, Death of Climate Champion Saleemul Huq in The Guardian, France24

“As the world prepares for COP28, the onus is on global leaders, corporations and individuals to rise to the occasion and champion the cause of climate justice. Wealthy nations must start putting real funding towards loss and damage, while ramping up their mitigation and adaptation efforts, and reining in the influence of the fossil fuel industry in climate policies,” Farhana Sultana, professor of geography and the environment, writes in The Guardian.

November 3, 2023

Huber Weighs In on the Latest Victory in the United Auto Workers Strike in El País Article

Matthew Huber, professor of geography and the environment, calls the outcome of the strike a huge victory for the United Auto Workers and its workers. “It shows that when workers harness their collective power through strikes, they can force employers to give in to workers’ ambitious demands,” he says.

November 2, 2023

See related: Income, Labor, United States

Rutherford Quoted in PolitiFact Article on Shift to Electric Vehicles

If the (Biden) administration does not incentivize an electric transition, it means the U.S. will cede EV [electric vehicle] leadership to China," says Tod Rutherford, professor of geography and the environment. "The Europeans are very alarmed by this and especially the German manufacturers are scrambling to catch up."

October 30, 2023

Rutherford Talks to Barron’s, Christian Science Monitor About the UAW Strike

“There is a very different kind of spirit right now” in the UAW, Tod Rutherford, professor of geography and the environment, tells Christian Science Monitor. “People are just saying, ‘That’s enough. We’ve got to do something, make a stand.’”

October 6, 2023

See related: Income, Labor, United States

Maxwell Sociologists Honored and Elected to Leadership Positions at ASA Annual Meeting

Prema Kurien and Janet M. Wilmoth received awards, and several faculty colleagues were elected to roles in the American Sociological Association. 

October 4, 2023

Huber Discusses the Climate Class War in UnHerd Article

"Rather than tackling the problem of who owns and controls fossil-fuel based production (a relative minority of society), carbon behaviouralism aims its sights on the “irresponsible” choices of millions of consumers of all classes," writes Matt Huber, professor of geography and the environment.

October 3, 2023

Kristy Buzard Explores Gender Disparities in Economics

She is part of a three-member team that received a $157,065 grant from the Women in Economics and Mathematics Research Consortium.

September 28, 2023

Rutherford Talks to Marketplace About the United Auto Workers Strike

When automakers faced bankruptcy in 2008, auto workers faced a tough decision: lose jobs or agree to contract changes that would help the companies get a federal bailout. The union chose the latter. “This was a concession they had to make in order to sustain the bailouts and have some kind of recovery,” says Tod Rutherford, professor of geography and the environment.

September 25, 2023

See related: Income, Labor, United States

Huber Weighs In on United Auto Workers Strike in The Hill

“The UAW…strike action is ultimately trying to realize one of the Biden Administration’s core policy goals and political selling points: you can have good, family-sustaining union jobs alongside climate action. The problem is the automakers see EV production as a way to trim labor costs and shift production to non-union plants,” says Matt Huber, professor of geography and the environment.

September 19, 2023

Action anthropology and public policy change: Lead poisoning in Syracuse, NY

Sandra D. Lane, Robert A. Rubinstein, Occeana Fair, Katie Farkouh, Melaica Delgado, Tanya S. McGee, Kinley Gaudette, Paul Ciavarri, Maureen Thompson, Md Koushik Ahmed

"Action anthropology and public policy change: Lead poisoning in Syracuse, NY," co-authored by Distinguished Professor of Anthropology Robert Rubinstein, was published in the Annals of Anthropological Practice.

September 19, 2023

Taylor Speaks with CBC News, International Business Times About the Prigozhin Plane Crash

Brian Taylor, professor of political science, says that he believes Prigozhin is dead and he agrees with Biden. "Putin made clear at the time he saw the mutiny as 'treason' and 'a stab in the back,' which he was unlikely to forget or forgive," he says.

September 1, 2023

Does Community-Based Adaptation Enhance Social Capital? Evidence from Senegal and Mali

Hannah Patnaik, John McPeak

"Does Community-Based Adaptation Enhance Social Capital? Evidence from Senegal and Mali," co-authored by Hannah Patnaik, managing director of the Maxwell X Lab, and John McPeak, professor of public administration and international affairs, was published in the Journal of Development Studies.

August 29, 2023

Ryan Griffiths Receives NSF Grant to Research Global War Patterns

The professor of political science will focus on historical trends of intrastate and interstate battles since the 18th century. 

August 17, 2023

Sanctions: Greater Congressional Oversight Needed for Costly, Ineffective "Go-To" Policy

Kristen Patel, William A. Lichtenfells, Esq.

"Sanctions: Greater Congressional Oversight Needed for Costly, Ineffective "Go-To" Policy," co-authored by Kristen Patel, Donald P. and Margaret Curry Gregg Professor of Practice in Korean and East Asian Affairs, was published in the Syracuse Law Review.

August 7, 2023

Sultana Named to First Cohort of American Association of Geographer’s Elevate the Discipline Program

One of 15 geographers from 11 states and the West Indies, Farhana Sultana, professor of geography and the environment, will focus on climate and society. 

August 3, 2023

Huber Weighs In on Tennessee Valley Authority’s Small Nuclear Reactor Program in Canary Media Piece

“This is a perfect sweet spot for a public power entity to take on some of that risk, to try to really get a technology that we need off the ground,” Matt Huber, professor of geography and the environment, says of TVA’s small modular reactor program. ​“They have the resources and the social mission to do that, where private capital wouldn’t.”

August 3, 2023

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The Future of the Middle East: Israel’s Integration into the Arab World

220 Eggers Hall, the Strasser Legacy Room

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Ambassador Dani Dayan, Consul General of Israel in New York.  

Ambassador Dayan is known as an Israeli public intellectual, lecturer, and entrepreneur. As consul general, he represents the State of Israel to communities throughout New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Delaware.  He previously served as chairman and chief foreign envoy of the Council of Jewish Communities in Judea and Samaria. In these roles, he opened doors to the major seats of government worldwide and conducted regular meetings with foreign diplomats and journalists. He began his career as an entrepreneur and businessman, founding the high-tech company Elad Systems in 1982; he sold his interests in the firm in 2005, at which time it employed 500 IT professionals. Prior to Elad, he spent seven-plus years in the Israel Defense Forces’ elite MAMRAM data processing center, attaining the rank of major.  Amb. Dayan has been a regular commentator in the international press. He has contributed to the New York Times, Boston Globe, The Guardian, CNN, BBC, Al Jazeera, and many more. 


Free and open to the public.  Refreshments will be served.  CART provided.

For parking and other inquiries, please contact Deborah Toole at datoole@syr.edu  or 315.443.2367


Sponsored by: Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration (PARCC), International Relations Program, Hillel, Jewish Studies , and the Middle Eastern Program-Moynihan Institute of Global Affairs, all at Syracuse University.


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