Skip to Main Content

Connect with Us Remotely

Maxwell / Campbell
  • Campbell Public Affairs News

  • Gadarian speaks to Associated Press about mask mandates

    Iowa is among at least eight Republican-led states that have limited the ability of school boards to impose mask mandates. More recently, arguments about masks heated up after federal Judge Robert Pratt blocked enforcement of the mask mandate ban, leading several school boards to require masks in their schools. Shana Gadarian, professor and chair of political science, says it’s important to weigh the motivation of politicians questioning public health measures proven to slow virus spread. "Politicians are trying to win reelection. They’re trying to keep their approval ratings up," she says. Read more in the Associated Press article, "Iowa focuses on masks as coronavirus deaths rise."

     

    Three faculty members named O’Hanley Scholars

    The Maxwell School is pleased to announce three new O’Hanley Faculty Scholars: Saba Siddiki, associate professor of public administration and international affairs; Martin Shanguhyia, associate professor of history; and Chris Faricy, associate professor of political science. Each was selected for outstanding teaching, scholarship and other accomplishments, including success with external grant support and service to the institution. The O’Hanley Faculty Endowed Fund for Faculty Excellence was created with a major gift from Ron O’Hanley, a 1980 graduate of the Maxwell School with a B.A. in political science.

     

    Gadarian speaks to FiveThirtyEight about partisanship, COVID

    Polls and vaccination rates have shown Republicans are less likely to be vaccinated, and more likely to say they don’t plan to get the shot than Democrats. Based on research she and her colleagues have been conducting, Shana Gadarian says there has been a partisan split on all health behaviors (not only the vaccine but also mask wearing, hand washing, visiting one’s doctor) throughout the pandemic. "Partisanship is not the sole determinant, but it is the strongest, most consistent determinant, even controlling for age, education, where people are living, how many COVID-19 cases are in the area," says Gadarian. Read more in the FiveThirtyEight article, "Republicans Aren’t New To The Anti-Vaxx Movement."

     

    Reeher quoted in Eagle Tribune article on 9/11 attacks

    There's little doubt that the U.S. and the world was forever changed on September 11, 2001. At the time of the terror attacks, recalls Professor Grant Reeher, director of the Campbell Public Affairs Institute, "There was great hope and expectation it would have a profound impact on our civil life and lead to a recapturing of some of what we lost in the decades leading up to it, that it would be a wake-up call for people to become more engaged." But, he says, "We fell very short of attaining the civic hopes that moment generated." Read more in the Eagle Tribune article, "In 20 years since 9/11 attacks, nation remains forever changed."

     

    Gadarian quoted in USA Today piece on TX abortion law, Republicans

    A Texas law, known as SB 8, and signed by Republican Gov. Greg Abbott in May, bans abortions when a fetal heartbeat is detected, usually at about six weeks. It includes a provision in which private citizens can sue abortion providers and anyone involved in "aiding and abetting" abortions, including someone driving a person to an abortion clinic. Shana Gadarian, professor of political science, weighs in on the impact of SB 8 on Republican voters in the USA Today article, "Texas abortion law could hurt Republicans in 2022 midterm elections, experts say."

     

    O'Keefe featured in CNN article on how 9/11 changed travel

    University Professor Sean O'Keefe, who in 2001 was deputy director of the Office of Management and Budget in the George W. Bush administration, spoke with CNN about the enormous changes 9/11 brought to the airline industry. That September morning in 2001 "flipped the switch right away from almost non-existent security to unbelievable, in-your-face, all the time," says O'Keefe. He's featured in the article "How 9/11 changed travel forever."

     

    Thompson quoted in Spectrum piece on Kathy Hochul, Biden attending SU

    Prior to this year, no United States president, nor New York governor had ever graduated from Syracuse University. As of August 24, the college can claim both. "Certainly, the fact that Gov. Hochul graduated from the Maxwell School as an undergraduate meant that she was getting education in political science, economics, history and so forth, from some really leading people in the field," says Margaret Susan Thompson, associate professor of history and political science. "I think it will encourage applicants who have a desire to pursue careers in public service,” she says. Read more in the Spectrum News article, "Sitting U.S. president, NY governor both earned degrees at Syracuse University."

     

    Reeher talks with The Hill about vaccine refusual in spite of FDA approval

    Professor of Political Science Grant Reeher speaks with The Hill about polarization and entrenched views against COVID vaccination in spite of FDA approval.

     

    Keck study on international judicial behavior published in LSI

    "Diplomats in Robes: Judicial Career Paths and Free Speech Decision-Making at the European Court of Human Rights," co-authored by Thomas Keck, Michael O. Sawyer Chair of Constitutional Law and Politics, and Ph.D. candidate Claire Sigsworth, was published in Law & Social Inquiry. Their findings show that former judicial career is related to voting patterns in free speech cases. This relationship is clearest for former diplomats, who stand out both for their willingness to vote against freedom-of-expression claims and for their inclination to author dissents against holdings supporting such claims.

     

    Reeher quoted in Washington Times article on Kathy Hochul

    Incoming New York Gov. Kathy Hochul is a Democrat but her political background is far from left-wing. "The left is going to perceive a real window of opportunity here," says Professor Grant Reeher, director of the Campbell Public Affairs Institute. "Their calculation is going to be that they’ll try to portray her as someone who’s not strong enough on the causes. And the assumption will be that there’s no way [Democrats] can lose the general election." Read more in the Washington Times article, "Hochul’s conservative lean likely to entice challengers from the left."

     

    O'Keefe weighs in on military vaccine mandate in Gray DC piece

    Military leaders recently announced that all 1.3 million active duty service members will be required to be fully vaccinated as soon as mid-September to fight the highly contagious Delta variant. Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin says this new requirement is critical to maintaining military readiness. University Professor Sean O’Keefe strongly supports the vaccine mandate. He points to the COVID-19 outbreak aboard the USS Theodore Roosevelt early in the pandemic, which sickened 1,200 sailors and killed one. "This virus isn’t discriminatory. It will take out people with unbelievably great health conditions," says O’Keefe. Read more in the Gray DC piece, "Florida Congressman raises concerns with military vaccine mandate."

     

    Reeher speaks to Newsweek, WETM, WSTM about Gov. Cuomo's resignation

    Gov. Andrew Cuomo resigned on Tuesday after an investigation by New York State Attorney General Letitia James found Cuomo sexually harassed 11 women. "For a lot of people, they're going to hear this and say well more of the same," Professor Grant Reeher tells WSTM. "I wasn't really surprised first of all. More of the same. Here we go again." Reeher also spoke to numerous media outlets about Cuomo's resignation.

     

    Reeher discusses Gov. Cuomo's political future with WAER, WETM, WSYR

    A report released on Tuesday by New York Attorney General Letitia James found that Gov. Andrew Cuomo sexually harassed 11 women and created a "hostile" work environment for women. The findings of her civil review into the harassment allegations have created a political firestorm around Cuomo, with Democratic leaders at all levels of government calling for him to resign. “I have not heard any prominent democratic voice calling for him not to resign and calling for him to continue to resist,” Professor Grant Reeher tells WETM. He also spoke to WAER and WSYR about Cuomo's political future.

     

    Thompson quoted in Global Sisters Report article on US sisters, racism

    Congregations across the United States are undergoing examinations of their histories and the lack of Black sisters and women of color. For many communities, sisters' efforts to eliminate racism are beginning by first addressing their own failures. The same way the United States cannot address institutionalized racism if it will not recognize the history that created it, Catholic sisters will not be able to build relationships with Black communities if they will not acknowledge how they have hurt them, says Margaret Susan Thompson. "They have to deal with their own histories to deal with the present," she says.  Read more in the Global Sisters Report article, "'Our reckoning': US sisters take up call to examine their role in systemic racism."

     

    Gadarian piece on COVID vaccine, partisanship published on Smerconish

    "Why Trump and the GOP Didn’t Claim Vaccines," co-authored by Professor Shana Kushner Gadarian, was featured on Michael Smerconish's blog. "There is now a large partisan gap between the vaccinated and unvaccinated that is growing over time. Many eligible Americans are choosing not to get vaccinated and increasingly, those who choose to remain unvaccinated and unprotected identify as Republicans and live in Republican counties," writes Gadarian and her co-authors. "There is, in fact, a strong negative correlation across nearly every state in the union between county-level Trump vote share in 2020 and vaccination rates, measured using data maintained by the CDC."

     

    Jackson discusses masculinity for Black boys and men in The 19th

    Young Black men are especially constrained by society’s narrow definitions of masculinity. That’s why having a safe place to be their authentic selves is crucial. Fostering self-care and self-love is part of building healthy masculinity, says Jenn Jackson, assistant professor of political science. "When it comes to young Black men and performing this masculinity, the stakes are really, really high,” Jackson says. "You can’t, as some people have told me in my research, you can’t wave your hands and be upset in public…when you look irate, you’re more likely to draw attention and you may end up in a confrontation with police officers.” Read more in The 19th article, "Building through affirmation: How one class helps Black boys define masculinity."

     

    Reeher discusses NY congressional redistricting in Daily Star

    In New York, drawing new congressional lines is likely to spark turf battles across political circles, as the state will lose one of its 27 congressional districts. Redistricting in New York, says Professor Grant Reeher, has produced "a paradox of good government goals running up against political realities." If the goal is to flip a seat from control by one party to another, he says, a possible target could be U.S. Rep. Claudia Tenney, R-New Hartford. Because Tenney recaptured her old seat in the last election by a razor-thin margin, "you could make a difference pretty easily there" by modifying the district lines, Reeher says. Read more in the Daily Star article, "New Yorkers get chance to weigh in before new political maps take shape."

     

    Maxwell School announces 2021 faculty promotions

    The Syracuse University Board of Trustees has approved promotions for six faculty members at the Maxwell School. They are: Alan Allport, who was promoted to professor of history; Shana Kushner Gadarian, who was promoted to professor of political science; Dimitar Gueorguiev, who was promoted to associate professor of political science; Matt Huber, who was promoted to professor of geography and the environment; Guido Pezzarossi, who was promoted to associate professor of anthropology; and Junko Takeda, who was promoted to professor of history.

     

    Reeher quoted in LocalSYR article on gun buyback programs

    The City of Syracuse is partnering with New York Attorney General Letitia James on a gun buyback program this summer. Professor Grant Reeher says the amount of guns in the United States keeps growing. When it comes to homicides, he says money should be invested in programs in the places where gun crimes and gang violence happen the most. "Particularly in poorer areas of cities," Reeher adds. "Those are the people that suffer the consequences of this most heavily. Again, that’s a big investment. You’re talking about social programs, you’re talking about job programs, you’re talking about criminal justice initiatives—those all cost a lot of money." Reeher was quoted in the LocalSYR article, "A closer look at the effectiveness of gun buyback programs."

     

    Faricy weighs in on Democrat's proposed tax strategy in WSJ

    Top Democrats are in the process of designing a roughly $1 trillion infrastructure deal, and a second, broader antipoverty package and they need to resolve differences over the amount of spending, how much must be paid for, and which of Mr. Biden’s proposed tax increases should advance. "A lot of Democratic voters are moderate to conservative. A lot of Democratic voters have low trust in government,” says Christopher Faricy, associate professor of political science. "You have to tie it to something that is popular, that you can sell to people that will be an improvement in their day-to-day lives." Read more in the Wall Street Journal article, "Democrats Focus on Turning Tax Talk Into Action."

     

    Gadarian quoted in Vox piece on political polarization, COVID vaccine

    The COVID-19 epidemic in the U.S., at face value, has become a division between those who are vaccinated and those who are unvaccinated. But, increasingly, it’s also a division between Democrats and Republicans—as vaccination has ended up on one of the biggest dividing lines in the U.S., political polarization. "Partisanship is now the strongest and most consistent divider in health behaviors," says Professor Shana Gadarian. "It didn’t have to be this way," Gadarian says. "There’s really nothing about the nature of being a right-wing party that would require undercutting the threat of COVID from the very beginning." Gadarian was quoted in the Vox article, "How political polarization broke America’s vaccine campaign."

     

    Thompson discusses US-Vatican relationship in The Hill

    Secretary of State Antony Blinken recently visited with Pope Francis in what was seen as an attempt to reset relations between Washington and the Holy See following former President Trump’s administration. "In this meeting, it seems that there was far more cordiality and acknowledgment of what the U.S. and Vatican have in common," says Margaret Susan Thompson. "I think this is emblematic of Pope Francis’s entire papacy that he has always emphasized a more comprehensive view of Catholic social teaching, he is not a single-issue pope," Thompson says. "There’s plenty about the Biden administration that the pope can work with. There’s plenty of areas they can agree on." Read more in The Hill article, "Post-Trump, Biden seeks to restore US relations with Holy See."

     

    Pralle examines changes in flood insurance rate maps in RHCPP

    "To appeal and amend: Changes to recently updated Flood Insurance Rate Maps," co-authored by Associate Professor of Political Science Sarah Pralle, was published in Risk, Hazards & Crisis in Public Policy. The findings suggest changes to flood zones on Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRM) occur more often where people have greater socioeconomic means, raising questions of equity for future FIRM appeals and revisions.

     

    Thompson quoted in The Hill article on banning communion for Biden

    U.S. bishops are set to open a debate over whether President Biden, the second Catholic president in U.S. history, and other politicians should be denied communion based on their stance on abortion. It promises to be a testy discussion on a sensitive issue that is dividing people from the top of the Vatican, with some bishops eager to make an example of Biden and others warning this would weaponize the Holy Communion. "There really is a tension between bishops and that tension has always existed in the USCCB (U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops), it’s always been there. It’s just a question of what is predominant," says Margaret Susan Thompson. She was quoted in The Hill article, "Bishops to debate banning communion for president."

     

    Reeher quoted in The Hill article on Biden, success of democracies

    President Joe Biden is casting his first international trip as an opportunity to prove to the world that democracies work—but Americans are just as polarized as their elected representatives. "Biden does have a challenge," says Professor Grant Reeher. "He is arguing, 'I am here as the American president to be the leading voice.' But then he is subject to people saying, 'Wait a minute, look at what you folks have been going through. Why is it you? Why isn’t it [German Chancellor] Angela Merkel? Or one of the other leaders?' And it’s a legitimate criticism," he says. Read more in The Hill article, "The Memo: Biden says democracies work; the US is not helping his case."

     

    Gadarian comments on upcoming NYS mayoral races in City & State

    Incumbent mayors are facing challenges in Albany, Buffalo, Rochester and Syracuse—Upstate New York’s four largest cities. These races are largely following a pattern found in recent Democratic primaries in New York, especially in New York City: More moderate incumbents are being challenged by opponents who say they have failed to address injustices like police brutality and income inequality. "I think what you’re seeing in upstate is pretty similar to what the discussion is at the national level in the Democratic Party, which is the progressive wing being more prominent than what you’ve seen in the past, and progressive Democrats running quite clearly on being progressive," says Professor Shana Gadarian. Read more in the City & State article, "Upstate incumbent mayors face challenges from the left."

     

    Abdelaaty talks to NBN about her book Discrimination and Delegation

    Lamis Abelaaty, assistant professor of political science, spoke with the New Books Network about her recently published book "Discrimination and Delegation: Explaining State Responses to Refugees" (Oxford University Press, 2021). Abdelaaty develops a two-part theoretical framework in which policymakers in refugee-receiving countries weigh international and domestic concerts. At the international level, policymakers consider relations with the refugee-sending country. At the domestic level policymakers consider political competition among ethnic groups. When these international and domestic incentives conflict, shifting responsibility to the UN allows policymakers to placate both refugee-sending countries and domestic constituencies.

     

    Faricy quoted in MarketWatch article on Child Tax Credit payouts

    The U.S. government is preparing to send up to $300 a month per child in expanded Child Tax Credit payouts to millions of families this summer. The payouts are due to start July 15 and stem from March’s $1.9 trillion stimulus law. "The Child Tax Credit isn’t new," says Christopher Faricy. "What might be new is the motivation driving this in the Biden administration, which is a real understanding about how outdated the social safety net is—and recognizing the dual-earner status as becoming much more common since the post-World War II era, when a lot of the safety net was built." Read more in the MarketWatch article, "Monthly payments of up to $300 per child are starting for most families — and could keep coming for years."

     

    Reeher comments on probes into Gov. Cuomo allegations in Newsday

    Inquiries regarding the Cuomo administration's handling of nursing homes and deaths from COVID-19, the governor's possible use of state personnel and resources to help produce his most recent book and the multiple allegations of sexual harassment leveled at the governor are advancing. "You’ve got three different institutions looking at accusations and he’s going to have to have clean bills of health on all of them to survive," says Professor Grant Reeher. "And the state-level institutions are all in his (Democratic) party, so he can’t claim partisan politics. That makes it tougher for him." Reeher was quoted in the Newsday article, "Cuomo probes move toward critical points with his tenure, legacy at stake."

     

    Lasch-Quinn explores useful philosophy of Bridgerton in Zócalo

    In her piece published in Zócalo, "Can 'Bridgerton' Teach Us How to Live?," Professor Elisabeth Lasch-Quinn looks at whether the "voguish Netflix show that also carries strong resonances from the philosophical past" can help us learn how to live. "Even if renewed interest in ancient philosophies of living has reappeared on the horizon, this does not mean new references or allusions resemble anything more than bits and pieces, no longer recognizably related to a conversation about how to live a morally good life," writes Lasch-Quinn. "While 'Bridgerton,' like many other expressions of all kinds, might refer vaguely to Epicureanism, anyone reading the ancient texts, or about them, will see the difference," she says.

     

    Thompson talks to CNY Central about the Jan. 6 commission

    An independent, bipartisan commission plans to investigate the Jan. 6 riot, providing new insight into how and why it happened and the security vulnerabilities it exposed of the Capitol complex. "The group of people responsible for this is pretty extensive," says Margaret Susan Thompson, associate professor of history and political science. She was quoted in the CNY Central article, "Bipartisan commission to investigate January 6 attack on U.S. Capitol."

     

    Faricy explains popularity of US's complex tax code in Fortune

    Tax experts and economists have long thought the U.S. tax code is inefficient, inequitable and full of opportunities for evasion. Christopher Faricy argues that, despite the complaints, Americans want it that way. "The tax code is so complicated because it is filled with myriad deductions and exclusions that Americans can take for engaging in certain activities, such as buying a home, saving for retirement and paying down student loan debt," writes Faricy and co-author Christopher Ellis. "Rather than spending money directly by subsidizing or providing these things, the government instead places incentives in the tax code for individuals to engage in these activities in private markets." Read more in the article, "America’s messy tax code is actually quite popular," published in Fortune.

     

    Elizabeth Cohen quoted in TIME article on future of VOICE

    For four years, the Victims of Immigration Crime Engagement office (VOICE) was used by the White House to perpetuate Trump’s false narrative of an immigrant crime wave. The VOICE office was an integral part of the effort to "trawl for anecdotes to then trumpet and publicize because there wasn’t good data to demonstrate that there’s a massive problem with non-citizen criminality," says Elizabeth Cohen, professor of political science and expert on immigration. She was quoted in the TIME article, "Trump Created an Office That Highlighted Immigrant Crime. Biden's DHS Plans to Keep It."

     

    O'Keefe talks to CNN about Boom Supersonic aircraft

    Boom Supersonic is one of several start-ups working on reviving supersonic air travel. Its long-term ambition is to get anywhere in the world in four hours at a price point of just $100. "It's an audacious goal!" says University Professor Sean O'Keefe. While it's feasible, O'Keefe reckons "it's going to require two or three generations of technology, development and breakthrough—which equates to about 20 years." Read more in the CNN article, "Boom Supersonic: 'Anywhere in the world in four hours for $100'."

     

    Van Slyke talks to Capital Tonight about fighting climate change

    Dean David Van Slyke discusses the need for government to work with the private sector and help facilitate a multi-faceted approach to triage, mitigate and prevent the effects of climate change in the coming years. "There really has to be a different governance approach to create mutually beneficial outcomes where those different partners can act out," says Van Slyke. Watch his full interview with Capital Tonight, "What role can government play in fighting climate change?"

     

    Maxwell faculty, staff and students honored with 2021 One University awards

    Syracuse University announced its 2021 One University Awards, honoring members of the University community for their scholarship, teaching, academic achievement, leadership and service. The ceremony was held virtually this year due to COVID-19 precautions.

     

    Gadarian talks to WAER about Biden's proposals in speech to Congress

    Shana Gadarian, associate professor and chair of political science, says the agenda President Biden laid out in his speech to a joint session of Congress is a vision that government can help people and be used for good. "This is a moment where the public in the election and public opinion polls is open to using big social policies and big government bills to try and help spur economic growth and rescue a lot of the industries that were hurt very badly by the pandemic," says Gadarian. Read more in the WAER article, "Biden Proposals 'Nothing Short of Revolutionary' For Families Hurt By Pandemic."

     

    Elizabeth Cohen quoted in Economist piece on race, class, wasted time

    An analysis of Bureau of Labour Statistics surveys shows how time is wasted by race and class. Calculations suggest wealthy white Americans get what they want quickly. But among black Americans, those earning at least $150,000 actually spend more time cooling their heels than those earning $20,000 or less. Whether it’s about being asked to produce more paperwork for a mortgage or waiting while someone white is bumped to the front of the queue, says Elizabeth Cohen, professor of political science and author of "The Political Value of Time," "waiting is part of the experience of racism in the U.S.” Cohen was quoted in The Economist article, "Black Americans spend more of the day being kept waiting."

     

    Reeher discusses political realignment in The Hill

    Important figures in the Republican party that are usually pro-business are instead criticizing the corporate world; for example, the corporate reaction to the voting law recently passed in Georgia. Is there a possibility of a significant political realignment? Professor Grant Reeher says, "Political scientists and pundits have been looking for a fundamental realignment now for 50 years. I don’t know what the Mark Twain phrase would be—rumors of a realignment can be greatly exaggerated?" Despite the common narrative that Democrats had been abandoned by the working class, "the data doesn’t actually support that," Reeher says. Read more in The Hill article, "Exclusive — Cruz, Rubio ramp up criticisms of big business."

     

    Faricy cited in NYT article on state and local tax deduction debate

    Christopher Faricy's book "Welfare for the Wealthy: Parties, Social Spending, and Inequality in the United States" (Cambridge University Press, 2015) was cited in the New York Times article, "Why a $10,000 Tax Deduction Could Hold Up Trillions in Stimulus Funds." The state and local tax deduction (SALT) allows people to deduct payments like state income and local property taxes from their federal tax bills. The deduction, previously unlimited, was capped at $10,000 in 2017. Proposals to raise or undo the cap have since been discussed as part of the stimulus packages passed during the COVID-19 pandemic. Such benefits are known as “tax expenditures,” or tax breaks that flow mostly to the highest-earning households, which Faricy discusses in his book.

     

    Elizabeth Cohen discusses immigration policy in 2021 in AlterNet piece

    "From a failure to rescind the former president's Title 42, causing almost all recent asylum-seekers to be expelled from the U.S., to President Biden's equivocation on the 2021 refugee cap, it's almost impossible to find good news about immigration policy in 2021," writes Professor Elizabeth Cohen. "But the very phrase 'border security' is misleading, training our minds on ominous-sounding but imaginary threats from outside the U.S. and distracting us from the very real threat posed by an enormous militarized force charged with policing immigration," she says. Read more in Cohen's article "Immigrants aren't the real threat in the United States — ICE and the Border Patrol are," published by AlterNet.

     

    Shana Kushner Gadarian is a 2021 Carnegie Fellow

    Shana Kushner Gadarian, associate professor and chair of political science, has been named a 2021 Carnegie Fellow. As recipients of the so-called “brainy award,” each Carnegie Fellow receives a grant of up to $200,000, making it possible to devote significant time to research, writing and publishing in the humanities and social sciences. The award is for a period of up to two years, and its anticipated result is a book or major study. Gadarian’s Carnegie-funded project, “Pandemic Politics: How COVID-19 Revealed the Depths of Partisan Polarization,” will investigate the long-term impacts of the pandemic on health behaviors and evaluations of government performance.

     

    Jackson quoted in Vox article on police reform

    Following the Derek Chauvin verdict, President Joe Biden called for changing policing by "acknowledging and confronting, head-on, systemic racism and the racial disparities that exist in policing and in our criminal justice system more broadly." One such idea is to abolish the police. Proponents think communities can work together to regulate themselves without "anti-Black, white supremacist institutions," like the American criminal justice system and policing—which got its start with slave patrols—according to Jenn Jackson, assistant professor of political science. Read more in the Vox article, "9 ideas to solve the broken institution of policing."

     

    Keck talks to PolitiFact about court packing

    Democratic lawmakers have introduced a measure to increase the number of Supreme Court justices from nine to 13. They say this is necessary to counter "court packing" by Republicans in the past few years, but Republicans say the Democrats’ bill is itself a clear example of court packing. Professor Thomas Keck says a court expansion can be justified. "If it’s the case that Sen. McConnell and other Republican leaders engaged in illegitimate court packing of their own from 2016 to 2020, then from the Democrats’ perspective, an additional round of court reform is necessary to correct for those earlier rounds," he says. Read more in the PolitiFact article, "The continuing battle over 'court packing' and the Supreme Court."

     

    Jackson quoted in the Guardian article on the use of tasers by police

    Tasers are often cited as a crucial tool in combating police violence in America, but experts and advocates have raised major concerns about the mass deployment of Tasers in recent years, including police mistaking them for guns. "The reforms haven’t changed the way that especially Black and brown folks experience policing,” says Jenn Jackson, assistant professor of political science. "We are still seeing the same violence…Whatever tools that police officers have at their disposal will be used to physically harm those people, whether it’s a billy club, hose, a dog, a Taser or a gun." Read more in the Guardian article, "Daunte Wright case: why Tasers have failed to stop police killings."

     

    Thompson discusses 19th century distrust of nuns in Global Sisters Rpt

    In the 19th century, immigrant nuns were viewed with profound hostility by members of the Protestant establishment. To suspicious Protestants, women religious were obvious stand-ins for Catholicism, says Margaret S. Thompson, associate professor of history and political science. "They are highly visible, there are more of them than priests, they wear habits, they look different, which is highly suspicious, and they don't marry. They give women options outside of marriage. So, in that sense, they are dangerous," she says. Thompson was interviewed for the Global Sisters Report article, "At America's Door: How nuns, once suspect, won the heart of non-Catholic America."

     

    Gadarian speaks to City & State about NY State Sen. Rachel May

    As a representative, Sen. Rachel May is responsible for balancing the competing ideologies and perspectives in the 53rd district, which includes the City of Syracuse. She made her case as a candidate to push for progressive legislation typically associated with downstate Democrats, while also representing parts of rural Central New York. "There are appealing things about the progressive agenda that May and others have that speaks to the economic struggles of places in the City of Syracuse," says Shana Gadarian, associate professor of political science. "That may be less appealing to people, say in the far suburbs, north of the city." Read more in the City & State article, "Rachel May, a different kind of upstate Democrat."

     

    Reeher quoted in Newsday article on Gov. Cuomo's budget

    Gov. Andrew Cuomo adopted a $212 billion state budget last week that raised spending $18 billion, or nearly 10%. "New York had a significant budget problem prior to COVID and Cuomo was already warning about it," says Professor Grant Reeher. "Then COVID hit. Then the federal government comes in with enough money to cover it and the left reacts by spending even more money and raising taxes to do it." Read more in the Newsday article, "State budget fallout: A weakened Cuomo, emboldened lawmakers."

     

    Keck discusses Supreme Court reform, crises of democracy in Wash Post

    President Biden issued an executive order forming the Presidential Commission on the Supreme Court of the United States, comprised of a bipartisan group of experts on the Court and the Court reform debate. History shows that debates over changing the Court’s size and structure have generally taken place during periods of crisis in American democracy. "Throughout U.S. history, crises of democracy have prompted discussions of Supreme Court reform because the court itself has often been perceived as a barrier to democratic preservation and renewal," writes Professor Thomas Keck. His article, "Biden is considering overhauling the Supreme Court. That’s happened during every crisis in U.S. democracy," was published in the Washington Post.

     

    Faricy research cited in Forbes article on American Rescue Plan

    "The Other Side of the Coin: Public Opinion toward Social Tax Expenditures" (Russel Sage Foundation, 2021), co-authored by Christopher Faricy, associate professor of political science, was cited in the Forbes article, "Making The Most Of A Crisis, Biden Links Recovery And Tax Reform." Faricy and co-author Christopher Ellis (Bucknell University) have judged the American Rescue Plan to be "the largest expansion to the American welfare state in a generation."

     
  • Stay Informed

    Sign up to receive "Closer Look," a semi-monthly digest of Maxwell news and commentary.

    Subscribe today


Campbell Public Affairs Institute
306 Eggers Hall
Syracuse, NY 13244-1090
Phone: +1.315.443.9707