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  • Reeher quoted in The Hill article on Biden, success of democracies

    President Joe Biden is casting his first international trip as an opportunity to prove to the world that democracies work—but Americans are just as polarized as their elected representatives. "Biden does have a challenge," says Professor Grant Reeher. "He is arguing, 'I am here as the American president to be the leading voice.' But then he is subject to people saying, 'Wait a minute, look at what you folks have been going through. Why is it you? Why isn’t it [German Chancellor] Angela Merkel? Or one of the other leaders?' And it’s a legitimate criticism," he says. Read more in The Hill article, "The Memo: Biden says democracies work; the US is not helping his case."

     

    Gadarian comments on upcoming NYS mayoral races in City & State

    Incumbent mayors are facing challenges in Albany, Buffalo, Rochester and Syracuse—Upstate New York’s four largest cities. These races are largely following a pattern found in recent Democratic primaries in New York, especially in New York City: More moderate incumbents are being challenged by opponents who say they have failed to address injustices like police brutality and income inequality. "I think what you’re seeing in upstate is pretty similar to what the discussion is at the national level in the Democratic Party, which is the progressive wing being more prominent than what you’ve seen in the past, and progressive Democrats running quite clearly on being progressive," says Professor Shana Gadarian. Read more in the City & State article, "Upstate incumbent mayors face challenges from the left."

     

    Abdelaaty talks to NBN about her book Discrimination and Delegation

    Lamis Abelaaty, assistant professor of political science, spoke with the New Books Network about her recently published book "Discrimination and Delegation: Explaining State Responses to Refugees" (Oxford University Press, 2021). Abdelaaty develops a two-part theoretical framework in which policymakers in refugee-receiving countries weigh international and domestic concerts. At the international level, policymakers consider relations with the refugee-sending country. At the domestic level policymakers consider political competition among ethnic groups. When these international and domestic incentives conflict, shifting responsibility to the UN allows policymakers to placate both refugee-sending countries and domestic constituencies.

     

    Faricy quoted in MarketWatch article on Child Tax Credit payouts

    The U.S. government is preparing to send up to $300 a month per child in expanded Child Tax Credit payouts to millions of families this summer. The payouts are due to start July 15 and stem from March’s $1.9 trillion stimulus law. "The Child Tax Credit isn’t new," says Christopher Faricy. "What might be new is the motivation driving this in the Biden administration, which is a real understanding about how outdated the social safety net is—and recognizing the dual-earner status as becoming much more common since the post-World War II era, when a lot of the safety net was built." Read more in the MarketWatch article, "Monthly payments of up to $300 per child are starting for most families — and could keep coming for years."

     

    Reeher comments on probes into Gov. Cuomo allegations in Newsday

    Inquiries regarding the Cuomo administration's handling of nursing homes and deaths from COVID-19, the governor's possible use of state personnel and resources to help produce his most recent book and the multiple allegations of sexual harassment leveled at the governor are advancing. "You’ve got three different institutions looking at accusations and he’s going to have to have clean bills of health on all of them to survive," says Professor Grant Reeher. "And the state-level institutions are all in his (Democratic) party, so he can’t claim partisan politics. That makes it tougher for him." Reeher was quoted in the Newsday article, "Cuomo probes move toward critical points with his tenure, legacy at stake."

     

    Lasch-Quinn explores useful philosophy of Bridgerton in Zócalo

    In her piece published in Zócalo, "Can 'Bridgerton' Teach Us How to Live?," Professor Elisabeth Lasch-Quinn looks at whether the "voguish Netflix show that also carries strong resonances from the philosophical past" can help us learn how to live. "Even if renewed interest in ancient philosophies of living has reappeared on the horizon, this does not mean new references or allusions resemble anything more than bits and pieces, no longer recognizably related to a conversation about how to live a morally good life," writes Lasch-Quinn. "While 'Bridgerton,' like many other expressions of all kinds, might refer vaguely to Epicureanism, anyone reading the ancient texts, or about them, will see the difference," she says.

     

    Thompson talks to CNY Central about the Jan. 6 commission

    An independent, bipartisan commission plans to investigate the Jan. 6 riot, providing new insight into how and why it happened and the security vulnerabilities it exposed of the Capitol complex. "The group of people responsible for this is pretty extensive," says Margaret Susan Thompson, associate professor of history and political science. She was quoted in the CNY Central article, "Bipartisan commission to investigate January 6 attack on U.S. Capitol."

     

    Faricy explains popularity of US's complex tax code in Fortune

    Tax experts and economists have long thought the U.S. tax code is inefficient, inequitable and full of opportunities for evasion. Christopher Faricy argues that, despite the complaints, Americans want it that way. "The tax code is so complicated because it is filled with myriad deductions and exclusions that Americans can take for engaging in certain activities, such as buying a home, saving for retirement and paying down student loan debt," writes Faricy and co-author Christopher Ellis. "Rather than spending money directly by subsidizing or providing these things, the government instead places incentives in the tax code for individuals to engage in these activities in private markets." Read more in the article, "America’s messy tax code is actually quite popular," published in Fortune.

     

    Elizabeth Cohen quoted in TIME article on future of VOICE

    For four years, the Victims of Immigration Crime Engagement office (VOICE) was used by the White House to perpetuate Trump’s false narrative of an immigrant crime wave. The VOICE office was an integral part of the effort to "trawl for anecdotes to then trumpet and publicize because there wasn’t good data to demonstrate that there’s a massive problem with non-citizen criminality," says Elizabeth Cohen, professor of political science and expert on immigration. She was quoted in the TIME article, "Trump Created an Office That Highlighted Immigrant Crime. Biden's DHS Plans to Keep It."

     

    O'Keefe talks to CNN about Boom Supersonic aircraft

    Boom Supersonic is one of several start-ups working on reviving supersonic air travel. Its long-term ambition is to get anywhere in the world in four hours at a price point of just $100. "It's an audacious goal!" says University Professor Sean O'Keefe. While it's feasible, O'Keefe reckons "it's going to require two or three generations of technology, development and breakthrough—which equates to about 20 years." Read more in the CNN article, "Boom Supersonic: 'Anywhere in the world in four hours for $100'."

     

    Van Slyke talks to Capital Tonight about fighting climate change

    Dean David Van Slyke discusses the need for government to work with the private sector and help facilitate a multi-faceted approach to triage, mitigate and prevent the effects of climate change in the coming years. "There really has to be a different governance approach to create mutually beneficial outcomes where those different partners can act out," says Van Slyke. Watch his full interview with Capital Tonight, "What role can government play in fighting climate change?"

     

    Maxwell faculty, staff and students honored with 2021 One University awards

    Syracuse University announced its 2021 One University Awards, honoring members of the University community for their scholarship, teaching, academic achievement, leadership and service. The ceremony was held virtually this year due to COVID-19 precautions.

     

    Gadarian talks to WAER about Biden's proposals in speech to Congress

    Shana Gadarian, associate professor and chair of political science, says the agenda President Biden laid out in his speech to a joint session of Congress is a vision that government can help people and be used for good. "This is a moment where the public in the election and public opinion polls is open to using big social policies and big government bills to try and help spur economic growth and rescue a lot of the industries that were hurt very badly by the pandemic," says Gadarian. Read more in the WAER article, "Biden Proposals 'Nothing Short of Revolutionary' For Families Hurt By Pandemic."

     

    Elizabeth Cohen quoted in Economist piece on race, class, wasted time

    An analysis of Bureau of Labour Statistics surveys shows how time is wasted by race and class. Calculations suggest wealthy white Americans get what they want quickly. But among black Americans, those earning at least $150,000 actually spend more time cooling their heels than those earning $20,000 or less. Whether it’s about being asked to produce more paperwork for a mortgage or waiting while someone white is bumped to the front of the queue, says Elizabeth Cohen, professor of political science and author of "The Political Value of Time," "waiting is part of the experience of racism in the U.S.” Cohen was quoted in The Economist article, "Black Americans spend more of the day being kept waiting."

     

    Reeher discusses political realignment in The Hill

    Important figures in the Republican party that are usually pro-business are instead criticizing the corporate world; for example, the corporate reaction to the voting law recently passed in Georgia. Is there a possibility of a significant political realignment? Professor Grant Reeher says, "Political scientists and pundits have been looking for a fundamental realignment now for 50 years. I don’t know what the Mark Twain phrase would be—rumors of a realignment can be greatly exaggerated?" Despite the common narrative that Democrats had been abandoned by the working class, "the data doesn’t actually support that," Reeher says. Read more in The Hill article, "Exclusive — Cruz, Rubio ramp up criticisms of big business."

     

    Faricy cited in NYT article on state and local tax deduction debate

    Christopher Faricy's book "Welfare for the Wealthy: Parties, Social Spending, and Inequality in the United States" (Cambridge University Press, 2015) was cited in the New York Times article, "Why a $10,000 Tax Deduction Could Hold Up Trillions in Stimulus Funds." The state and local tax deduction (SALT) allows people to deduct payments like state income and local property taxes from their federal tax bills. The deduction, previously unlimited, was capped at $10,000 in 2017. Proposals to raise or undo the cap have since been discussed as part of the stimulus packages passed during the COVID-19 pandemic. Such benefits are known as “tax expenditures,” or tax breaks that flow mostly to the highest-earning households, which Faricy discusses in his book.

     

    Elizabeth Cohen discusses immigration policy in 2021 in AlterNet piece

    "From a failure to rescind the former president's Title 42, causing almost all recent asylum-seekers to be expelled from the U.S., to President Biden's equivocation on the 2021 refugee cap, it's almost impossible to find good news about immigration policy in 2021," writes Professor Elizabeth Cohen. "But the very phrase 'border security' is misleading, training our minds on ominous-sounding but imaginary threats from outside the U.S. and distracting us from the very real threat posed by an enormous militarized force charged with policing immigration," she says. Read more in Cohen's article "Immigrants aren't the real threat in the United States — ICE and the Border Patrol are," published by AlterNet.

     

    Shana Kushner Gadarian is a 2021 Carnegie Fellow

    Shana Kushner Gadarian, associate professor and chair of political science, has been named a 2021 Carnegie Fellow. As recipients of the so-called “brainy award,” each Carnegie Fellow receives a grant of up to $200,000, making it possible to devote significant time to research, writing and publishing in the humanities and social sciences. The award is for a period of up to two years, and its anticipated result is a book or major study. Gadarian’s Carnegie-funded project, “Pandemic Politics: How COVID-19 Revealed the Depths of Partisan Polarization,” will investigate the long-term impacts of the pandemic on health behaviors and evaluations of government performance.

     

    Jackson quoted in Vox article on police reform

    Following the Derek Chauvin verdict, President Joe Biden called for changing policing by "acknowledging and confronting, head-on, systemic racism and the racial disparities that exist in policing and in our criminal justice system more broadly." One such idea is to abolish the police. Proponents think communities can work together to regulate themselves without "anti-Black, white supremacist institutions," like the American criminal justice system and policing—which got its start with slave patrols—according to Jenn Jackson, assistant professor of political science. Read more in the Vox article, "9 ideas to solve the broken institution of policing."

     

    Keck talks to PolitiFact about court packing

    Democratic lawmakers have introduced a measure to increase the number of Supreme Court justices from nine to 13. They say this is necessary to counter "court packing" by Republicans in the past few years, but Republicans say the Democrats’ bill is itself a clear example of court packing. Professor Thomas Keck says a court expansion can be justified. "If it’s the case that Sen. McConnell and other Republican leaders engaged in illegitimate court packing of their own from 2016 to 2020, then from the Democrats’ perspective, an additional round of court reform is necessary to correct for those earlier rounds," he says. Read more in the PolitiFact article, "The continuing battle over 'court packing' and the Supreme Court."

     

    Jackson quoted in the Guardian article on the use of tasers by police

    Tasers are often cited as a crucial tool in combating police violence in America, but experts and advocates have raised major concerns about the mass deployment of Tasers in recent years, including police mistaking them for guns. "The reforms haven’t changed the way that especially Black and brown folks experience policing,” says Jenn Jackson, assistant professor of political science. "We are still seeing the same violence…Whatever tools that police officers have at their disposal will be used to physically harm those people, whether it’s a billy club, hose, a dog, a Taser or a gun." Read more in the Guardian article, "Daunte Wright case: why Tasers have failed to stop police killings."

     

    Thompson discusses 19th century distrust of nuns in Global Sisters Rpt

    In the 19th century, immigrant nuns were viewed with profound hostility by members of the Protestant establishment. To suspicious Protestants, women religious were obvious stand-ins for Catholicism, says Margaret S. Thompson, associate professor of history and political science. "They are highly visible, there are more of them than priests, they wear habits, they look different, which is highly suspicious, and they don't marry. They give women options outside of marriage. So, in that sense, they are dangerous," she says. Thompson was interviewed for the Global Sisters Report article, "At America's Door: How nuns, once suspect, won the heart of non-Catholic America."

     

    Gadarian speaks to City & State about NY State Sen. Rachel May

    As a representative, Sen. Rachel May is responsible for balancing the competing ideologies and perspectives in the 53rd district, which includes the City of Syracuse. She made her case as a candidate to push for progressive legislation typically associated with downstate Democrats, while also representing parts of rural Central New York. "There are appealing things about the progressive agenda that May and others have that speaks to the economic struggles of places in the City of Syracuse," says Shana Gadarian, associate professor of political science. "That may be less appealing to people, say in the far suburbs, north of the city." Read more in the City & State article, "Rachel May, a different kind of upstate Democrat."

     

    Reeher quoted in Newsday article on Gov. Cuomo's budget

    Gov. Andrew Cuomo adopted a $212 billion state budget last week that raised spending $18 billion, or nearly 10%. "New York had a significant budget problem prior to COVID and Cuomo was already warning about it," says Professor Grant Reeher. "Then COVID hit. Then the federal government comes in with enough money to cover it and the left reacts by spending even more money and raising taxes to do it." Read more in the Newsday article, "State budget fallout: A weakened Cuomo, emboldened lawmakers."

     

    Keck discusses Supreme Court reform, crises of democracy in Wash Post

    President Biden issued an executive order forming the Presidential Commission on the Supreme Court of the United States, comprised of a bipartisan group of experts on the Court and the Court reform debate. History shows that debates over changing the Court’s size and structure have generally taken place during periods of crisis in American democracy. "Throughout U.S. history, crises of democracy have prompted discussions of Supreme Court reform because the court itself has often been perceived as a barrier to democratic preservation and renewal," writes Professor Thomas Keck. His article, "Biden is considering overhauling the Supreme Court. That’s happened during every crisis in U.S. democracy," was published in the Washington Post.

     

    Faricy research cited in Forbes article on American Rescue Plan

    "The Other Side of the Coin: Public Opinion toward Social Tax Expenditures" (Russel Sage Foundation, 2021), co-authored by Christopher Faricy, associate professor of political science, was cited in the Forbes article, "Making The Most Of A Crisis, Biden Links Recovery And Tax Reform." Faricy and co-author Christopher Ellis (Bucknell University) have judged the American Rescue Plan to be "the largest expansion to the American welfare state in a generation."

     

    Reeher discusses Biden's infrastructure plan in National Interest

    President Biden recently unveiled a portion of his nearly $3 trillion infrastructure, jobs and climate change package. "The case that Biden made to centrists and to some conservatives in the election is that he wouldn’t lurch too far to the left once elected. But this price tag will make that case harder to sustain," says Professor Grant Reeher. "If we look at the policy record since 1993, no Democrat has really succeeded at the national level by going big." Read more in the National Interest article, "Joe Biden to Unveil Infrastructure Package Tomorrow. What Will it Include?"

     

    Reeher weighs in on NY's 2022 gubernatorial race in Press-Republican

    With less than 20 months to go before the Nov. 8, 2022, statewide election, many potential scenarios are being discussed, and the most informed people can only speculate as to who the major party nominees for governor will be. Professor Grant Reeher says next year's Democratic primary may favor a left-leaning candidate such as Attorney General Letitia James, should she decide to go for the governor's office. The anchor of James' political strength is metropolitan New York City, which has the bulk of Democratic votes in the state. Read more in the Press-Republican article, "Cuomo crisis ignites hope for GOP as 2022 nears."

     

    Pralle talks to Forbes about FEMA's upcoming changes, flood insurance

    Flood insurance premiums for millions of at-risk homes and businesses could surge as much as four times what they currently pay over the next few years when FEMA announces its "Risk Rating 2.0." For homeowners, or prospective buyers, "rising insurance rates could lead to a reduction in home values," says Sarah Pralle, associate professor of political science, and "they could be forced to sell at a loss, or even abandon their property." Pralle agrees that flood insurance has to change, but the government needs to "help vulnerable communities and homeowners who’ll struggle with the transition." Read more in the Forbes article, "FEMA’S Upcoming Changes Could Cause Flood Insurance To Soar At The Shore."

     

    Reeher weighs in on Tucker Carlson 2024 run in National Interest

    Tucker Carlson, host of Fox News’s "Tucker Carlson Tonight," has been floated as a contender for a presidential run in 2024. "Carlson has been keen to focus on the supposed failings and absurdities of Democratic elites, and that puts him in as good a position as any to inherit his supporters—those for whom Trump, as an individual candidate and office-holder, carried some extra appeal beyond the standard Republican brand," says Grant Reeher, professor of political science. He was quoted in the National Interest article, "How Tucker Carlson Could Take Over the GOP and Run in 2024."

     

    Jackson talks about Black women's experiences with COVID in GenForward

    In their article, "This Women’s History Month, Recognize Black Women’s Efforts To Save Ourselves," published by the GenForward Survey, Jenn Jackson discusses Black women's experiences with COVID-19. "This Women’s History Month, as we celebrate our wins it’s critical that we acknowledge how Black women continue to struggle against the disproportionate impacts of health precarity and how that struggle has only been compounded during the pandemic," writes Jackson. "For many of these women, it isn’t just the health institutions and systemic racism that shape their experiences during the pandemic. It has also been the proliferation of unreliable information sources since the start of the global health crisis."

     

    Faricy piece on Biden's American Rescue Plan published in The Hill

    "Our recent analysis of public opinion about people’s attitudes toward government assistance shows that Democrats can gain the support of conservative voters for assistance to the poor through smart policy design. And there is no better example than the American Rescue Plan (ARP)," Associate Professor of Political Science Chris Faricy and Christopher Ellis (Bucknell University) write. "In particular, the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and Child Tax Credit (CTC) are targeted toward the working poor, and disproportionately help families of color," they say. "The Biden proposal for expanding these two programs is projected to cut the child poverty rate in half." Read more in The Hill article, "Why Republicans couldn't kill Biden's relief bill."

     

    Gadarian quoted in Jewish Insider article on Rep. Tenney, NY-22 race

    The race for New York district 22 wasn’t decided until February 5, when a judge ruled that Claudia Tenney (R-NY) should be certified as the winner. Tenney and Anthony Brindisi (D-NY) were separated by just 12 votes in the original count, but a range of issues linked to voter registration and inconsistencies and failures in vote counting across the district led to a final margin of 109 votes. Shana Gadarian says neither voter ID laws nor voter roll maintenance would have solved the problems the district faced, which were related primarily to counting and failures to successfully register voters who believed they had done so. Read more in the Jewish Insider article, "109 votes brought Rep. Claudia Tenney back to Congress."

     

    Gadarian speaks to the Telegraph about Hunter Biden's memoir

    Hunter Biden, son of President Joe Biden, has a memoir coming out April 6, 2021, that will center on his well publicized struggles with substance abuse. "He’s a person who’s been in the public eye for a long time. He was at the center of President Trump’s first impeachment, and his public image has been framed to some extent by the political opposition, so his aim may be to establish a public record in his own words," says Shana Gadarian. "It would not be surprising if he wanted to run for some sort of office at some point and is putting this out in anticipation of that," she adds. Read more in the Telegraph article, "Sober reflection: will a memoir rescue the reputation of President Biden's black sheep son?"

     

    Reeher quoted in The Hill article on Biden's COVID-19 vaccine plan

    President Biden announced on Tuesday that there will be enough vaccinations for every American adult by the end of May, much sooner that his previous projection of July. "He has been careful to make clear that he is not saying the whole thing will be behind us by the end of May," says Professor Grant Reeher. "While it is possible to be too optimistic, it is also possible to be too pessimistic," he adds. "I mean, the president does need to give the American public reasons for hope—we have seen that since FDR. I think [Biden] is beginning to do that, and I think now is the time for it." Read more in The Hill article, "The Memo: Biden's COVID-19 bet comes with deep risks."

     

    Young study on coproduction, digital service delivery published in PMR

    "The impact of technological innovation on service delivery: social media and smartphone integration in a 311 system," authored by Assistant Professor of Public Administration and International Affairs Matthew Young, was published in Public Management Review. Young analyzes whether technological changes to coproduction systems improve effectiveness, and whether improvements come at the expense of equity.

     

    Lambright study on globalizing public administration published

    "Charting three trajectories for globalizing public administration research and theory," co-authored by Professor of Public Administration and International Affairs Harry Lambright, was published in the Asia Pacific Journal of Public Administration. Lambright and his co-authors highlight three trajectories. The first is to build generalizable theories to enhance global applicability. The second trajectory is to be more inclusive of diverse perspectives in the mainstream of public administration scholarship. The final trajectory is to scale up the lens of inquiry beyond the nation-state to include global governance actors and organizations.

     

    Keck quoted in CSM article on the impeachment process

    After two tumultuous impeachments of former President Donald Trump in little over a year, it’s clear that today the impeachment process works far differently than the Founding Fathers intended. "What I would emphasize is that there are structural problems with our democracy, some of which are really hard to fix, but some of which have emerged recently which there are fixes for," says Thomas Keck, professor of political science and Michael O. Sawyer Chair of Constitutional Law and Politics. Read more in the Christian Science Monitor article, "Four impeachments, zero removals: Sign of cracks in Constitution?"

     

    Gadarian speaks to WTSP about post-COVID mask-wearing

    Masks are part of our everyday routine right now but will Americans continue to wear them post-pandemic? "There's a cultural norm in China or in Hong Kong and other places to wear a mask when you yourself are sick, but in the U.S. the culture of individualism or individual choice is very strong," says Shana Gadarian, associate professor of political science. "To make people believe they are the experts in their own health decisions and they should do what helps them, rather than the community is a big hurdle to overcome," Gadarian says. Read more in the WTSP article, "Life after COVID: Will people still wear masks after the pandemic?"

     

    Reeher speaks to Newsweek about polarization in Congress

    Professor Grant Reeher says that he doesn't see "a lot of prospects" for Congress to govern in a bipartisan way "in the short term or the near long term," pointing out that the current level of political polarization has been decades in the making. "Ironically, what it will probably take to create more bipartisanship is for one party to establish clear, stable control of an institution," he says. "This happened for a good chunk of the 20th century with Democrats in Congress, and for a shorter period of time, with Republicans in the White House," Reeher explains. Read more in the Newsweek article, "Amid GOP Infighting Over Trump, Republicans Agree on Opposing Biden's Agenda."

     

    Keck piece on the purpose of impeachment published on Syracuse.com

    "The impeachment power’s primary function, in actual practice, is to lay down a marker for history," writes Thomas Keck, Michael O. Sawyer Chair of Constitutional Law and Politics. "Donald Trump has joined Andrew Johnson and Bill Clinton as the only presidents to be impeached, and he stands alone as the only president to suffer this fate more than once. Wherever U.S. history is fairly taught, this fact will be noted about his presidency," he says. Read more in Keck's article, "What’s the point of impeachment? ‘To lay down a marker for history’," published on Syracuse.com.

     

    Gadarian quoted in City & State article on Tenney's win in NY22

    In New York’s 22nd congressional district, Republican Claudia Tenney was certified as the winner on Monday, unseating moderate Democrat Anthony Brindisi—who just two years earlier defeated Tenney after her first term in Congress. "If you’re a Democrat who is trying to walk the line in a kind of socially conservative district, I think having to vote on impeachment, having to take positions on budgets—those are now (votes) that your opponent can push against," says Shana Gadarian, associate professor of political science. Read more in the City & State article, "How Claudia Tenney won back her seat in Congress."

     

    Abdelaaty study on human rights, refugee protection published in IJHR

    "The relationship between human rights and refugee protection: an empirical analysis," authored by Assistant Professor of Political Science Lamis Abdelaaty, was published in the International Journal of Human Rights. Abdelaaty examined the relationship between a government's respect for the rights of its own citizens and that government's regard for refugee rights and found that the relationship between citizens’ rights and refugee rights is modified by economic conditions and the size of the refugee population.

     

    Reeher discusses significance of Trump's impeachment trial in Newsweek

    "Regarding impeachment, polarization has led the two parties to dig in immediately and deeply. Clinton's impeachment is probably a better pure example of its effects," says Professor Grant Reeher. "Trump's behavior has been far more problematic and dangerous to the nation, but I still think that polarization has affected how each party has responded, and it has made impeachment—or defending a president or former president against it—a more likely response," he says. Read more in the Newsweek article, "Impeachment Trials Were Rare in U.S. History, Now Senate Begins Third in Just Over 20 Years."

     

    Faricy explores public perceptions of welfare via the U.S. tax code

    In their new book, “The Other Side of the Coin: Public Opinion toward Social Tax Expenditures” (Russel Sage Foundation), Christopher Faricy, associate professor of political science, and Bucknell University professor Christopher Ellis examine how public opinion differs between two types of economic aid—direct government assistance vs. indirect assistance in the form of tax subsidies.

     

    O'Keefe remembers Shuttle Columbia tragedy on LocalSYR's Bridge Street

    On February 1, 2003, the Space Shuttle Columbia broke up after a failed re-entry in the earth’s atmosphere and all seven astronauts on board were killed. University Professor Sean O'Keefe was NASA administrator when the tragedy occurred. "The courage that they [the victims' families] demonstrated that day became the source of resolve thereafter that all of us throughout the agency, throughout NASA, relied upon as a way to continually encourage us to do what they admonished us to do which was to find out what happened, go fix it, and then rededicate ourselves to the very objectives in which their loved ones had given their lives for" says O'Keefe. Watch the full interview via "Bridge Street" on LocalSYR.

     

    Lasch-Quinn discusses Ars Vitae on New Books Network

    Elisabeth Lasch-Quinn, professor of history, spoke with the New Books Network about her recently published book "Ars Vitae: The Fate of Inwardness and the Return of the Ancient Art of Living" (University of Notre Dame Press, 2020). Lasch-Quinn provides a cultural critique that connects the most pressing needs of the individual in modern society to the insights of the ancient approach to philosophy as a way of life.

     

    Himmelreich discusses vaccine verification systems in Brookings piece

    "Building robust and ethical vaccination verification systems," co-authored by Assistant Professor of Public Administration and International Affairs Johannes Himmelreich, was published in Brookings TechStream. "VRV systems present both opportunities and risks in tackling the COVID-19 pandemic," the authors say. "They offer hope of more accurate verification of vaccine status, but they also run the risk of both exacerbating existing health and economic inequalities and introducing significant security and privacy vulnerabilities." The authors argue that VRV systems ought to align with vaccine prioritization decisions, uphold fairness and equity, and be built on trustworthy technology.

     

    Thompson shares her thoughts on Biden, Harris with LocalSYR

    "President Biden served eight years as Vice President, so he was very much involved in the Obama Presidency," says Margaret Susan Thompson, associate professor of history and political science. "He saw things from the inside. But I think one of the things that’s going to make a big difference is his respect for and I think a reliance on expertise in a variety of fields." Thompson also believes Vice President Harris will play a big role over the next four years, especially because the Senate is so narrowly divided at this time. Watch the full interview via LocalSYR.com.

     

    Reeher talks to CNY Central about local benefits of a Biden presidency

    Professor Grant Reeher thinks a Biden presidency will be good for Central New York. "It might make it a little bit easier for John Katko to get the ear of the President if there's a major piece of legislation being negotiated," Reeher says. "We may be on his radar when he's thinking about the problems of small to mid-size cities. Are they getting the help from the federal government that they need? I think that is going to be a good thing for this area." Reeher was interviewed for the CNY Central story, "How CNY could benefit from Biden presidency."

     
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