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Maxwell School News and Commentary

Filtered by: Health Policy

Heflin Discusses Seniors’ Use of Food Benefits, Impact on Memory Decline in Neurology Today Article

"Screening for food insecurity can at least provide the clinician some sense of the risks their patients might be facing and their potential negative health consequences," says Colleen Heflin, professor of public administration and international affairs.

January 11, 2023

Montez Quoted in Washington Post Article on Politics, Policy and Increasing Mortality Rates

University Professor Jennifer Karas Montez says “state policy knobs are a lever that we could use to really turn this country around and stop this alarming—just horrible when you think about it—increase in the risk of dying before age 65.”

December 28, 2022

COVID Research Project Garners up to $2.2 Million From the National Institutes of Health

Associate Professor Emily Wiemers is the principal investigator of the team that includes her Maxwell School colleague, Marc A. Garcia. 

December 12, 2022

Prescription Opioid Resiliency and Vulnerability: A Mixed-Methods Comparative Case Study

Shannon Monnat, Andy Hochstetler, David J. Peters

"Prescription Opioid Resiliency and Vulnerability: A Mixed-Methods Comparative Case Study," co-authored by Professor of Sociology Shannon Monnat, was published in American Journal of Criminal Justice.

November 28, 2022

See related: Addiction, Health Policy

Catching Air: Risk and Embodied Ocean Health among Dominican Diver Fishermen

Kyrstin Mallon Andrews

"Catching Air: Risk and Embodied Ocean Health among Dominican Diver Fishermen," authored by Assistant Professor of Anthropology Kyrstin Mallon Andrews, was published in Medical Anthropology Quarterly.

November 23, 2022

Landes Piece on COVID’s Impact on Immunocompromised People Published by Hastings Center

"Moving On from Covid? Immunocompromised People Can’t," written by Associate Professor of Sociology Scott Landes, was published by the Hastings Center.

November 22, 2022

Monnat and Montez Talk to US News About Their Research on Link Between Policy and Mortality Rates

“State policies, which have been relatively ignored in research on explanations for U.S. mortality trends, turn out to be really important for understanding geographic disparities in mortality,” Shannon Monnat, professor of sociology, tells U.S. News & World Report.

November 2, 2022

Montez Discusses New Research on Link Between Policy and Mortality Rates With NBC News, USA Today

If states had adopted liberal policies across the board, University Professor Jennifer Karas Montez and her co-authors calculated that 171,030 lives would have been saved in 2019 alone; on the flip side, conservative policies in all states would have led to an additional 217,635 working-age deaths.

October 28, 2022

U.S. state policy contexts and mortality of working-age adults

Jennifer Karas Montez, Nader Mehri, Shannon M. Monnat, Jason Beckfield, Derek Chapman, Jacob M. Grumbach, Mark D. Hayward, Steven H. Woolf, Anna Zajacova

"U.S. state policy contexts and mortality of working-age adults," co-authored by sociologists Jennifer Karas Montez and Shannon Monnat, was published by PLoS ONE.

October 27, 2022

See related: Health Policy, Longevity

Monnat Comments on Increase in US Suicide Rates in Grid Article

“There might be a small drop in one or two years, but the long-term trend has been an increase,” says Shannon Monnat, professor of sociology. She was interviewed for the Grid article, "U.S. suicide rates rose again in 2021, ending a brief decline during the covid pandemic."

October 14, 2022

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