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Griffiths Contributes to New Book on Self-Determination and Secession

Ryan Griffiths, Aleksandar Pavković, Peter Radan

Ryan Griffiths, associate professor of political science, has contributed to and co-edited “The Routledge Handbook of Self-Determination and Secession” (Routledge, 2023). It investigates debates surrounding issues of self-determination and secession as well as the legal, political and normative implications they give rise to.

March 10, 2023

Taylor Discusses Russian Political Stability at CNAS Forum and in Washington Times Article

As we pass the one-year anniversary of Russia’s war in Ukraine, numerous factors such as the Russian military’s poor performance, Putin’s botched mobilization, mounting casualties, economic challenges resulting from sanctions and export controls, and increasingly visible elite fissures are raising questions about the political stability of the Russian regime. Brian Taylor, professor of political science, weighs in.

March 6, 2023

Thompson Quoted in France 24 Article on Nikki Haley and Donald Trump

"Nikki Haley has to negotiate the very thin line between differentiating herself from Donald Trump and still appealing to—or not alienating herself from—his supporters, who still constitute the vast majority of CPAC activists and GOP primary participants," says Margaret Susan Thompson, associate professor of history and political science.

March 3, 2023

Sultana Talks to Inside Climate News About the COP27 Loss and Damage Agreement

“When you can’t adapt to climate change at all and face interconnected issues surrounding loss and damage, the unbearable heaviness of climate coloniality is worsened,” says Farhana Sultana, professor of geography and the environment. “This means destruction, devastation and loss are so profound that one can’t finance one’s way out of it.”

March 3, 2023

Purser Discusses the Impact of Short-Duration Strikes in Bloomberg Law Article

“They capture the attention of management in a much more dramatic way than other forms of action and negotiation,” says Gretchen Purser, associate professor of sociology. “They’re showing the capacity for the workers to take collective action.”

February 28, 2023

See related: Labor, United States

Griffiths Speaks with Pluribus News About American Secessionist Movements

“Those processes, they’re hard to pull off. You need to have both sides in agreement. It just doesn’t happen that much,” says Ryan Griffiths, associate professor of political science. “The thresholds for success are just too high to make it work.”

February 28, 2023

One Year Later: Taylor Talks to WRVO About the Invasion Into Ukraine

For Brian Taylor, professor of political science, the biggest take from the one-year anniversary is Ukraine is still standing. "A year ago a lot of people might not have expected that, given Russia’s size, the size of the population, the size of its army, the size of its economy," Taylor says.

February 27, 2023

See related: Conflict, NATO, Russia, Ukraine

Taylor Speaks with La Presse About the War in Ukraine, Russia’s Persistence

The concentration of troops in the east of the country shows that the Russian president has not given up on his goal of enslaving Ukraine despite multiple setbacks since the launch of the invasion, says Brian Taylor, professor of political science.

February 22, 2023

See related: Conflict, Russia, Ukraine

Taylor Speaks with La Presse About Russian Oligarch Yevgeny Prigozhin

"My impression is that his power and visibility have increased a lot since the start of the war in Ukraine," says Brian Taylor, professor of political science. "He's a much more public figure than a year ago, and I think that reflects his ambition. And, up to a certain point, the impression it has of its current usefulness."

February 7, 2023

Abdelaaty Selected as a 2023 Migration Politics Residential Fellow

As a fellow, Lamis Abdelaaty, associate professor of political science, will work on her proposal, "The Emissary Speaks: Political Agency in Refugee-UNHCR Correspondence."

January 27, 2023

Herrold’s “Delta Democracy” Reviewed in Democratization

"Delta Democracy: Pathways to Incremental Civic Revolution in Egypt Beyond" (Oxford University Press, 2020), written by Associate Professor of Public Administration and International Affairs Catherine Herrold, was reviewed in Democratization.

January 27, 2023

McCormick Talks With BBC Newshour About the US Trial of Mexico’s Former Drug Czar

"Here we have yet one more opportunity to fully flesh out and understand what went wrong with the drug war in Mexico and why it could arguably be considered to be a colossal failure," says Gladys McCormick, associate professor of history and Jay and Debe Moskowitz Endowed Chair in Mexico-U.S. Relations.

January 25, 2023

Hromadžić Featured in Al Jazeera Article on the Balkans and the situation in Bosnia and Herzegovina

"People in the Balkans are trapped in ethnic grids, in a monstrous bureaucracy that doesn't work, brought to a 'status quo' that is paralyzing," says Azra Hromadžić, associate professor of anthropology. 

January 20, 2023

Thompson Talks to WRVO About the Scrutiny Surrounding Rep. George Santos

"If people decide that they will vote for somebody, regardless of what they may have done in their past, that's one thing," says Margaret Susan Thompson, associate professor of history and political science. "But if they vote under the misconception that somebody is what they say they are and then they find out later when it's too late that [it] is wrong. That's a very different situation."

January 18, 2023

Purser Weighs in on New York’s Minimum Wage Increase in WAER Article

"Because what we have been experiencing in recent years has been really historic levels of in terms of increase of the cost of living," says Gretchen Purser, associate professor of sociology. "And so this increased minimum wage doesn't reflect what we have all been experiencing, which is the rising cost of living."

January 17, 2023

See related: Income, Labor, New York State

Attitudes about Refugees and Immigrants Arriving in the United States: A Conjoint Experiment

Liza G. Steele, Lamis Abdelaaty, Nga Than

"Attitudes about Refugees and Immigrants Arriving in the United States: A Conjoint Experiment," authored by Associate Professor of Political Science Lamis Abdelaaty, was published in Ethnic and Racial Studies.

January 13, 2023

See related: Refugees, United States

Maxwell Students, Faculty Among SOURCE and Honors Grant Recipients

Eleven Maxwell School students have been awarded grants from the Syracuse Office of Undergraduate Research and Creative Engagement (SOURCE) and the Renée Crown University Honors Program. The awards provide up to $7,500 in support for original undergraduate research projects.

January 13, 2023

Purser Talks to ABC News About the Nurse Strike in New York City

"Nurses are really bargaining for the collective good. They are putting, first and foremost, patients' safety above all else and that was the breaking point—they've been working under less-than-ideal conditions that jeopardized the safety of patients," says Gretchen Purser, associate professor of sociology. 

January 11, 2023

McCormick Discusses the Arrest of El Chapo’s Son with Bloomberg, CNN, IBT, Wall Street Journal

Capturing Ovidio Guzmán could be a way for López Obrador to show the U.S. that he is “in control of the armed forces and Mexico’s security situation,” Gladys McCormick, Jay and Debe Moskowitz Endowed Chair in Mexico-U.S. Relations, tells CNN. “It also defuses the power behind any ask from the Biden administration to stem the tide of fentanyl and other narcotics across the border,” she adds.

January 9, 2023

Taylor Discusses President Zelensky’s Visit to the US in Newsweek Article

Brian Taylor, professor of political science, tells Newsweek that Zelensky's visit is "well-timed" and intends to signal that U.S. support remains strong, despite the Republican Party soon taking control of the House.

January 2, 2023

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The Labor Movement in the Age of Trump: Challenges and Prospects

220 Eggers Hall, Strasser Legacy Room

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Presented by the Labor Studies Working Group.  Guest Speaker: Jeffrey Grabelsky, Associate Director, The Worker Institute at the Industrial and Labor Relations School at Cornell University.  

The Labor Studies Working Group is an interdisciplinary group of faculty members and graduate students from Syracuse University. The primary goal of the group is to institutionalize Labor Studies at SU and to elevate labor―broadly defined―as a topic of intellectual inquiry and social and political importance on campus. The group meets on a regular basis to discuss research concerning labor and employment and to spark conversation on these issues on campus and in the community.   
The Labor Studies Working Group organizes workshops on faculty and graduate student research and symposia which are designed to bring together leading labor scholars with activists and/or practitioners to explore pertinent issues facing workers and workers’ movements. If you are interested in helping to plan, organize, or attend labor studies group events, contact the coordinators: Professor Gretchen Purser, gwpurser@maxwell.syr.edu, 315.443.5848 and Professor Matt Huber, mthuber@maxwell.syr.edu, 315.443.3845.                          

Sponsored by the Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration (PARCC) of the Syracuse University Maxwell School.


If you require accommodations, please contact Deborah Toole by email at datoole@syr.edu or by phone at 315.443.2367.


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400 Eggers Hall