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Center for Policy Research News

Geographically Specific Associations Between County-Level Socioeconomic Distress and Mortality

Xue Zhang, Shannon M. Monnat

"Geographically specific associations between county-level socioeconomic and household distress and mortality from drug poisoning, suicide, alcohol, and homicide among working-age adults in the United States," co-authored by Professor of Sociology Shannon Monnat, was published in SSM - Population Health.

January 11, 2024

Waiving SNAP Interviews during the COVID-19 Pandemic Increased SNAP Caseloads

Colleen Heflin, William Clay Fannin, Leonard Lopoo, and Siobhan O’Keefe
Counties that implemented the SNAP interview waiver during the COVID-19 pandemic experienced a 5% increase in SNAP participation.
January 10, 2024

Colleen Heflin Receives USDA Grant to Study Nutrition Assistance Programs

The research team will investigate how physical presence waivers impacted participation in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) program.

January 8, 2024

Popp Quoted in MIT Technology Review Article on the Return of Cleantech

“What is the path to market for these technologies?” asks David Popp, professor of public administration and international affairs. He attributes the collapse of startups in cleantech 1.0 largely to the lack of demand for green products in highly competitive commodity markets.

December 9, 2023

Yingyi Ma Examines Declining Enrollment of Chinese Students in the US in Brookings Article

"During my conversations with Tsinghua University faculty and students regarding whether they would consider studying in the United States, they expressed fear and anxiety about what they perceive as 'a hostile America' toward China—specifically, the U.S. policies targeting Chinese talent and the broader anti-China rhetoric," Yingyi Ma, professor of sociology.

December 6, 2023

Stronger Regulations on Air Pollution Could Reduce Cardiovascular Disease Mortality Rates

Yue Sun
Cutting air pollution to match the World Health Organization’s proposed standards could have prevented over 300,000 cardiovascular disease deaths in 2016-18. 
December 6, 2023

Assessment Frequency and Equity of the Property Tax: Latest Evidence from Philadelphia

Yilin Hou, Lei Ding, David J. Schwegman, Alaina G. Barca

"Assessment frequency and equity of the property tax: Latest evidence from Philadelphia," co-authored by Yilin Hou, professor of public administration and international affairs, was published in the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management.

November 30, 2023

See related: Taxation, United States

Popp Quoted in New York Times Article on Biden’s Union Support, Climate Regulations

David Popp, professor of public administration and international affairs, notes that while new factories will be needed to build electric vehicle batteries, the vehicles will require fewer suppliers producing parts. Many assembly workers will also need to be retrained. “We may also need fewer workers,” Popp says. But, he says, “there doesn’t seem to be a consensus yet on whether that is the case.”

November 22, 2023

Extreme Weather Events and Local Fiscal Responses: Evidence from US Counties

Qing Miao, Michael Abrigo, Yilin Hou, Yanjun (Penny) Liao

"Extreme Weather Events and Local Fiscal Responses: Evidence from U.S. Counties," co-authored by Yilin Hou, professor of public administration and international affairs, was published in Economics of Disasters and Climate Change.

November 20, 2023

Behavioral Science Interventions Could Increase SNAP Comprehension Among Military Families

Colleen Heflin, Hannah Patnaik, Leonard Lopoo, and Siobhan O’Keefe
Making small behavioral science informed changes to SNAP informational flyers increased military & veteran families’ knowledge about benefits & may help to increase SNAP uptake in this population. 
November 15, 2023

Training Future Professors in Public Budgeting, Finance, and Financial Management

Yilin Hou, Philip Joyce, Kurt Thurmaier, Katherine Willoughby

“Training future professors in public budgeting, finance, and financial management: The Inter-University Consortium for PhD courses,” co-authored by Yilin Hou, professor of public administration and international affairs, was published in the Journal of Public Affairs Education.

November 10, 2023

See related: Education, United States

Ueda-Ballmer Discusses the Issue Facing Japanese Women When Considering Marriage in Foreign Policy

Michiko Ueda-Ballmer, associate professor of public administration and international affairs, says many young Japanese women would like to get married, “but they simply cannot afford it. The result is that people don’t get married.”

November 1, 2023

RSF Grant Supports Research on Youth Poverty, Housing and International Migration

Maxwell sociologist Sean J. Drake is exploring the neighborhood and school experiences of refugee and other migrant youth in Syracuse and New York City.

October 27, 2023

Ueda-Ballmer Quoted in New York Times Article on Subway Platform Safety

Michiko Ueda-Ballmer, associate professor of public administration and international affairs, says the authority should install at least small metal gates to make the system safer. “It’s better than nothing,” she says. “If there’s somebody pushed, just by accident, and if you have metal bars, I think that would definitely help.”

October 26, 2023

Yilin Hou Honored with 2023 Aaron Wildavsky Award for Lifetime Achievement

Provided by the Association for Budgeting and Financial Management, the award honors his contributions to public administration, budgeting, financial management and fiscal policy analysis.

October 18, 2023

See related: Awards & Honors

Maxwell Sociologists Honored and Elected to Leadership Positions at ASA Annual Meeting

Prema Kurien and Janet M. Wilmoth received awards, and several faculty colleagues were elected to roles in the American Sociological Association. 

October 4, 2023

Maxwell Sociologists Receive $1.8 Million From the NIA to Study Midlife Health and Mortality

The research team led by Jennifer Karas Montez and Shannon Monnat hopes to better understand how state policies and local economic conditions impact health and mortality rates.

September 21, 2023

Explaining the US Rural Disadvantage in COVID-19 Case and Death Rates During the Delta-Omicron Surge

Malia Jones, Mahima Bhattar, Emma Henning, Shannon M. Monnat

"Explaining the U.S. rural disadvantage in COVID-19 case and Death rates during the Delta-Omicron surge: The role of politics, vaccinations, population health, and social determinants," co-authored by Professor of Sociology Shannon Monnat, was published in Social Science & Medicine.

September 6, 2023

Maxwell School Announces Recent Faculty Additions

The Maxwell School welcomes 16 new faculty members for the 2023-2024 academic year.
August 31, 2023

Understanding Regulation Using the Institutional Grammar 2.0

Saba Siddiki, Christopher K. Frantz

"Understanding regulation using the Institutional Grammar 2.0," co-authored by Saba Siddiki, director of the Center for Policy Design and Governance, was published in Regulation & Governance.

August 16, 2023

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Kasey Buckles (Notre Dame) will present "The Drug Crisis and the Living Arrangements of Children" as part of the CPR Seminar Series. For more information about the seminar series, please contact Emily Minnoe at erminnoe@syr.edu


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