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Gadarian Speaks with WBUR About the Politicization of COVID-19 and Its Impact on Democracy

May 26, 2023

“It turns out that partisanship just swamped everything else as early as March of 2020," says Shana Gadarian, professor and chair of political science. 

Madonna Harrington Meyer Reappointed as University Professor

May 15, 2023

In recognition of exceptional scholarship and innovative academic and professional activities, Madonna Harrington Meyer has been reappointed to a four-year term as University Professors, one of the highest honors the University bestows on faculty members. 

Montez Quoted in Boston Globe Article on Life Expectancy and Where People Live

April 24, 2023

In one study, University Professor Jennifer Karas Montez and other researchers found that, if every state simply implemented the same policy environment as Connecticut, “The U.S. would increase its life expectancy by roughly two years,” she says. “That is a massive increase.”

Maxwell Faculty and Students To Be Honored at 2023 One University Awards

April 19, 2023

The One University Awards Ceremony, an annual event to honor members of the Syracuse University community who are making a difference through academics, scholarship, creative work and dedicated service, will be held Friday, April 21.

See related: Awards & Honors

Hamersma Discusses the Impact of Medicaid Eligibility Reviews on County Residents With Syracuse.com

March 31, 2023

Sarah Hamersma, associate professor of public administration and international affairs, believes the number of Onondaga County residents who lose coverage will be less than the 9.5% estimated by a federal government study. That’s because New York’s Medicaid and other public health insurance programs are more generous than those offered by many other states, she says.

Harrington Meyer Quoted in New York Times Article on Grandfathering

March 9, 2023

Overall, grandmothers still take the lead in spending time with grandchildren, often rearranging their schedules to do so, says Madonna Harrington Meyer, University Professor and author of “Grandmothers at Work: Juggling Families and Jobs” (NYU Press, 2014).

Heflin Comments on New Study Linking Cognitive Decline, Food Insufficiency in Medical News Today

February 27, 2023

“Unfortunately,” says Colleen Heflin, professor and chair of public administration and international affairs, “my own work suggests that cognitive decline can act as a barrier to SNAP [Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program] participation among older adults eligible for the program, due to the difficult administrative processes associated with demonstrating program eligibility.”

New Knowledge - Tapping Into Maxwell’s Scholarly Distinction

February 24, 2023
Undergraduates at the Maxwell School now have almost limitless opportunities for research and deeper study.

Heflin Quoted in New York Times Article on the Impact of Increasing Food Prices on Seniors

February 15, 2023

“The lack of access to food can make older Americans more socially isolated,” says Colleen Heflin, professor and chair of public administration and international affairs.

Heflin Discusses Food Insecurity Among Military Families on Military Times Podcast

February 9, 2023

"Recent data from the Department of Defense indicates that one in four service members were food insecure at the end of 2020," says Colleen Heflin, professor and chair of public administration and international affairs.

Heflin Discusses Seniors’ Use of Food Benefits, Impact on Memory Decline in Neurology Today Article

January 11, 2023

"Screening for food insecurity can at least provide the clinician some sense of the risks their patients might be facing and their potential negative health consequences," says Colleen Heflin, professor of public administration and international affairs.

Landes Speaks with Academic Minute About the COVID-19 Burden on People with Disabilities

January 4, 2023

"There is a well-documented history in the U.S. of marginalizing people with IDD (intellectual or developmental disability). Our hope is that we will not add to that history, but will take the necessary steps to ensure that people with IDD are provided the opportunity to live and thrive in the midst of the ongoing pandemic," says Landes, associate professor of sociology.

Montez Quoted in Washington Post Article on Politics, Policy and Increasing Mortality Rates

December 28, 2022

University Professor Jennifer Karas Montez says “state policy knobs are a lever that we could use to really turn this country around and stop this alarming—just horrible when you think about it—increase in the risk of dying before age 65.”

COVID Research Project Garners up to $2.2 Million From the National Institutes of Health

December 12, 2022

Associate Professor Emily Wiemers is the principal investigator of the team that includes her Maxwell School colleague, Marc A. Garcia. 

Landes Piece on COVID’s Impact on Immunocompromised People Published by Hastings Center

November 22, 2022

"Moving On from Covid? Immunocompromised People Can’t," written by Associate Professor of Sociology Scott Landes, was published by the Hastings Center.

Engelhardt Speaks with CNN About the Increase in Social Security Payments in 2023

November 4, 2022

Asked about the White House’s assertion that “President Biden’s leadership” is responsible for the increase, Gary Engelhardt, professor of economics, tells CNN: “This assertion is incorrect.”

Monnat and Montez Talk to US News About Their Research on Link Between Policy and Mortality Rates

November 2, 2022

“State policies, which have been relatively ignored in research on explanations for U.S. mortality trends, turn out to be really important for understanding geographic disparities in mortality,” Shannon Monnat, professor of sociology, tells U.S. News & World Report.

Montez Discusses New Research on Link Between Policy and Mortality Rates With NBC News, USA Today

October 28, 2022

If states had adopted liberal policies across the board, University Professor Jennifer Karas Montez and her co-authors calculated that 171,030 lives would have been saved in 2019 alone; on the flip side, conservative policies in all states would have led to an additional 217,635 working-age deaths.

Hamersma Article on Scaling Up the Social Good Published in Comment Magazine

October 25, 2022

"What happens when we think of social goods—those that contribute to human thriving? Is scale just as problematic in those cases, or might we use its powers for good?" asks Sarah Hamersma, associate professor of public administration and international affairs.

Monnat Comments on Increase in US Suicide Rates in Grid Article

October 14, 2022

“There might be a small drop in one or two years, but the long-term trend has been an increase,” says Shannon Monnat, professor of sociology. She was interviewed for the Grid article, "U.S. suicide rates rose again in 2021, ending a brief decline during the covid pandemic."

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Lerner Center for Public Health Promotion and Population Health