Skip to content

Center for Policy Research News

Monnat and Montez Talk to US News About Their Research on Link Between Policy and Mortality Rates

“State policies, which have been relatively ignored in research on explanations for U.S. mortality trends, turn out to be really important for understanding geographic disparities in mortality,” Shannon Monnat, professor of sociology, tells U.S. News & World Report.

November 2, 2022

Research on Racial Disparities in Education by Professors Drake, Shi and Zhu Cited in NY Times

The work of Sean Drake, assistant professor of sociology, Ying Shi, assistant professor of public administration and international affairs, and Maria Zhu, assistant professor of economics, was referenced in the article, "Asian American Students Face Bias, but It’s Not What You Might Think."

November 1, 2022

Montez Discusses New Research on Link Between Policy and Mortality Rates With NBC News, USA Today

If states had adopted liberal policies across the board, University Professor Jennifer Karas Montez and her co-authors calculated that 171,030 lives would have been saved in 2019 alone; on the flip side, conservative policies in all states would have led to an additional 217,635 working-age deaths.

October 28, 2022

U.S. state policy contexts and mortality of working-age adults

Jennifer Karas Montez, Nader Mehri, Shannon M. Monnat, Jason Beckfield, Derek Chapman, Jacob M. Grumbach, Mark D. Hayward, Steven H. Woolf, Anna Zajacova

"U.S. state policy contexts and mortality of working-age adults," co-authored by sociologists Jennifer Karas Montez and Shannon Monnat, was published by PLoS ONE.

October 27, 2022

See related: Health Policy, Longevity

Hamersma Article on Scaling Up the Social Good Published in Comment Magazine

"What happens when we think of social goods—those that contribute to human thriving? Is scale just as problematic in those cases, or might we use its powers for good?" asks Sarah Hamersma, associate professor of public administration and international affairs.

October 25, 2022

Institutional Grammar: Foundations and Applications for Institutional Analysis

Saba Siddiki, Christopher K. Frantz

Saba Siddiki, associate professor of public administration and international affairs, and Christopher Frantz provide a general background on institutional analysis and the institutional grammar (IG) as well as provide a comprehensive overview of a revised version of the IG developed by the authors called the IG 2.0.

October 21, 2022

Popp Quoted in CNY Central Article on NY Gov. Hochul’s Plan to Have All New Cars be Electric by 2035

“The environmental benefits are largely going to impact disadvantaged communities if you think typically about tailpipe pollution,” says David Popp, professor of public administration and international affairs.

October 20, 2022

Monnat Comments on Increase in US Suicide Rates in Grid Article

“There might be a small drop in one or two years, but the long-term trend has been an increase,” says Shannon Monnat, professor of sociology. She was interviewed for the Grid article, "U.S. suicide rates rose again in 2021, ending a brief decline during the covid pandemic."

October 14, 2022

Wilcoxen Appointed to Treasury’s Climate-Related Financial Risk Advisory Committee

Peter Wilcoxen, Ajello Professor in Energy and Environmental Policy, is one of twenty members and one government observer who have been named as part of the establishment of the committee. The new committee will provide information and analysis to the Financial Stability Oversight Council.

October 11, 2022

Monnat Research on Mortality Trends Featured in New York Times Article

Professor of Sociology Shannon Monnat was also interviewed for the story, "‘There Are Two Americas Now: One With a B.A. and One Without’." 

October 6, 2022

Hou leads in public budgeting and financial management

Yilin Hou, professor of public administration and international affairs, is among those who conceived of the idea to address challenges faced by institutions that offered the graduate degree program. 

October 1, 2022

SU Part of a Team Awarded $60 Million USDA Grant to Promote Climate-Smart Commodities

Syracuse University is a leading partner in a multi-university project that aims to increase supply and demand for climate-smart commodities produced and manufactured in New York state, supported by a new grant from the USDA’s Partnership for Climate-Smart Commodities. The $60 million project is led by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation and Department of Agriculture and Markets

September 26, 2022

Three Maxwell Professors Named O’Hanley Faculty Scholars

The Maxwell School is pleased to announce three new O’Hanley Faculty Scholars: Margarita Estévez-Abe, Scott Landes and Emily Wiemers.

September 16, 2022

Room to Grow: Examining Participation and Stability in Child Care Subsidies Using State Data

Taryn W. Morrissey, Colleen M. Heflin, W. Clay Fannin

"Room to grow: examining participation and stability in child care subsidies using state administrative data," co-authored by Professor Colleen Heflin and M.P.A. student W. Clay Fannin, was published in Early Childhood Research Quarterly.

September 14, 2022

See related: Child & Elder Care

Popp Study on Role of Venture Capital, Governments in Clean Energy Published by CEPR

David Popp, Matthias van den Heuvel

"The role of venture capital and governments in clean energy: Lessons from the first cleantech bubble," co-authored by Professor David Popp, was published by The Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR).

September 12, 2022

See related: Climate Change, Energy

NSF Awards $750K for Research Project Examining Electric Vehicles’ Impact

Siddiki, associate professor of public administration and international affairs and Chapple Family Professor of Citizenship and Democracy, is co-principal investigator on the project, titled “Strengthening American Electricity Infrastructure for an Electric Vehicle Future: An Energy Justice Approach.”

September 7, 2022

U.S. State Preemption Laws and Working-Age Mortality

Douglas Wolf, Jennifer Karas Montez, Shannon Monnat

"U.S. State Preemption Laws and Working-Age Mortality," co-authored by Maxwell professors Douglas Wolf, Jennifer Karas Montez and Shannon Monnat, was published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

September 1, 2022

See related: Health Policy, Longevity

Maxwell Faculty Research on Paid Sick Leave, Mortality Rate Cited by CBS News, CTV News

"U.S. State Preemption Laws and Working-Age Mortality," co-authored by Maxwell professors Douglas Wolf, Jennifer Karas Montez and Shannon Monnat, was featured in CBS News and CTV News articles.

September 1, 2022

Self-Rated Physical Health Among Working-Aged Adults Along the Rural-Urban Continuum — US, 2021

Danielle Rhubart, Shannon Monnat

"Self-Rated Physical Health Among Working-Aged Adults Along the Rural-Urban Continuum — United States, 2021," co-authored by Professor Shannon Monnat, was published in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

August 29, 2022

Rural-Urban Variation in COVID-19 Experiences and Impacts among U.S. Working-Age Adults

Shannon Monnat

This study investigates rural-urban differences in COVID-19 in terms of its impacts on the physical and mental health, social relationships, employment, and financial hardship of U.S. working-age adults (18–64).

August 29, 2022

See related: COVID-19

Explore by:


Center for Policy Research Events

We continue to follow the advice of local public health officials in regards to in-person events. Please check Syracuse University’s Stay Safe website for the latest safety protocols before coming to campus or other in-person venues.

CPR Seminar Series - Alex Rothenberg

426 Eggers Hall

Add to: Outlook, ICal, Google Calendar

Alex Rothenberg (Center for Policy Research) will present “Unity in Diversity? How Intergroup Contact Can Foster Nation Building” as part of CPR's seminar series. For more information, please contact Emily Minnoe at erminnoe@maxwell.syr.edu. 


Open to

Public

Contact

Accessibility

Contact to request accommodations

View Lecture Series

Center for Policy Research
426 Eggers Hall