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Center for Policy Research News

Popp Quoted in New York Times Article on Biden’s Union Support, Climate Regulations

David Popp, professor of public administration and international affairs, notes that while new factories will be needed to build electric vehicle batteries, the vehicles will require fewer suppliers producing parts. Many assembly workers will also need to be retrained. “We may also need fewer workers,” Popp says. But, he says, “there doesn’t seem to be a consensus yet on whether that is the case.”

November 22, 2023

Extreme Weather Events and Local Fiscal Responses: Evidence from US Counties

Qing Miao, Michael Abrigo, Yilin Hou, Yanjun (Penny) Liao

"Extreme Weather Events and Local Fiscal Responses: Evidence from U.S. Counties," co-authored by Yilin Hou, professor of public administration and international affairs, was published in Economics of Disasters and Climate Change.

November 20, 2023

Behavioral Science Interventions Could Increase SNAP Comprehension Among Military Families

Colleen Heflin, Hannah Patnaik, Leonard Lopoo, and Siobhan O’Keefe
Making small behavioral science informed changes to SNAP informational flyers increased military & veteran families’ knowledge about benefits & may help to increase SNAP uptake in this population. 
November 15, 2023

Training Future Professors in Public Budgeting, Finance, and Financial Management

Yilin Hou, Philip Joyce, Kurt Thurmaier, Katherine Willoughby

“Training future professors in public budgeting, finance, and financial management: The Inter-University Consortium for PhD courses,” co-authored by Yilin Hou, professor of public administration and international affairs, was published in the Journal of Public Affairs Education.

November 10, 2023

See related: Education, United States

Ueda-Ballmer Discusses the Issue Facing Japanese Women When Considering Marriage in Foreign Policy

Michiko Ueda-Ballmer, associate professor of public administration and international affairs, says many young Japanese women would like to get married, “but they simply cannot afford it. The result is that people don’t get married.”

November 1, 2023

RSF Grant Supports Research on Youth Poverty, Housing and International Migration

Maxwell sociologist Sean J. Drake is exploring the neighborhood and school experiences of refugee and other migrant youth in Syracuse and New York City.

October 27, 2023

Ueda-Ballmer Quoted in New York Times Article on Subway Platform Safety

Michiko Ueda-Ballmer, associate professor of public administration and international affairs, says the authority should install at least small metal gates to make the system safer. “It’s better than nothing,” she says. “If there’s somebody pushed, just by accident, and if you have metal bars, I think that would definitely help.”

October 26, 2023

Yilin Hou Honored with 2023 Aaron Wildavsky Award for Lifetime Achievement

Provided by the Association for Budgeting and Financial Management, the award honors his contributions to public administration, budgeting, financial management and fiscal policy analysis.

October 18, 2023

See related: Awards & Honors

Maxwell Sociologists Honored and Elected to Leadership Positions at ASA Annual Meeting

Prema Kurien and Janet M. Wilmoth received awards, and several faculty colleagues were elected to roles in the American Sociological Association. 

October 4, 2023

Maxwell Sociologists Receive $1.8 Million From the NIA to Study Midlife Health and Mortality

The research team led by Jennifer Karas Montez and Shannon Monnat hopes to better understand how state policies and local economic conditions impact health and mortality rates.

September 21, 2023

Explaining the US Rural Disadvantage in COVID-19 Case and Death Rates During the Delta-Omicron Surge

Malia Jones, Mahima Bhattar, Emma Henning, Shannon M. Monnat

"Explaining the U.S. rural disadvantage in COVID-19 case and Death rates during the Delta-Omicron surge: The role of politics, vaccinations, population health, and social determinants," co-authored by Professor of Sociology Shannon Monnat, was published in Social Science & Medicine.

September 6, 2023

Maxwell School Announces Recent Faculty Additions

The Maxwell School welcomes 16 new faculty members for the 2023-2024 academic year.
August 31, 2023

Understanding Regulation Using the Institutional Grammar 2.0

Saba Siddiki, Christopher K. Frantz

"Understanding regulation using the Institutional Grammar 2.0," co-authored by Saba Siddiki, director of the Center for Policy Design and Governance, was published in Regulation & Governance.

August 16, 2023

Limiting Governments from Enacting Public Health Emergency Orders Led to Higher COVID-19 Death Rates

Xue Zhang, Mildred E. Warner, and Gen Meredith

The emergency public health policies that state and local governments enacted during the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in lower infection and death rates than would have occurred without these policies. New research from CPR & Lerner Postdoctoral Scholar Xue Zhang finds that states with unified Republican control were more likely to limit emergency authority during the COVID-19 pandemic, resulting in higher COVID-19 death rates in those states.

August 16, 2023

Adoption Of Standard Medical Deduction Increased SNAP Enrollment and Benefits in 21 States

Jun Li, Dongmei Zuo, Colleen Heflin

"Adoption Of Standard Medical Deduction Increased SNAP Enrollment And Benefits In 21 Participating States," co-authored by Professors Jun Li and Colleen Heflin, and Ph.D. student Dongmei Zuo, was published in Health Affairs.

August 8, 2023

Maxwell School Announces 2023 Faculty Promotions

Six faculty members were granted tenure and promoted to associate professor and three were promoted to professor.

July 31, 2023

Local Control, Discretion, and Administrative Burden: SNAP Interview Waivers/Caseloads During COVID

Colleen Heflin, William Clay Fannin, Leonard Lopoo

"Local Control, Discretion, and Administrative Burden: SNAP Interview Waivers and Caseloads During the COVID-19 Pandemic," co-authored by Maxwell faculty members Colleen Heflin and Leonard Lopoo, and doctoral student William Clay Fannin, was published in The American Review of Public Administration.

July 25, 2023

Ueda-Ballmer Weighs In on Japan’s Mental Health Crisis, Gender Inequality in The Nation Article

“Suicide was always a men’s issue,” says Michiko Ueda-Ballmer, associate professor of public administration and international affairs. During the pandemic, “suddenly, women’s suffering became visible.” For the first time, “the government was forced to confront an approach to suicide prevention that had previously focused exclusively on middle-aged men.” 

July 20, 2023

Students, Faculty Receive Spring 2023 SOURCE and Honors Research Grants

The awards support undergraduate research projects.

July 14, 2023

RIDGE Partnership Grant Supports Maternity Health Research

Associate Professor Sarah Hamersma and graduate student Mitch McFarlane will use the $75,000 grant to investigate the impacts of SNAP food assistance on maternal and infant health.

July 12, 2023

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Center for Policy Research Events

We continue to follow the advice of local public health officials in regards to in-person events. Please check Syracuse University’s Stay Safe website for the latest safety protocols before coming to campus or other in-person venues.

Paul Volcker Lecture in Behavioral Economics

Virtual

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Dr. Brigitte Madrian (Brigham Young University) will present the Sixth Annual Paul Volcker Lecture in Behavioral Economics, titled "Applying Behavioral Insights to the Design of Public Policy".


Dr. Madrian is the Dean and Marriott Distinguished Professor in the Brigham Young University Marriott School of Business where she has a joint appointment in the Department of Finance and the George W. Romney Institute of Public Service and Ethics. Her current research focuses on behavioral economics and household finance, with a particular focus on household saving and investment behavior. Her work in this area has impacted the design of employer-sponsored savings plans in the U.S. and has influenced pension reform legislation both in the U.S. and abroad. She also uses the lens of behavioral economics to understand health behaviors and improve health outcomes.


This is a virtual event via zoom. Registration is required. Please submit the registration form

For more information about the Volcker Lecture, please visit the Volcker Lecture website or contact Katrina Fiacchi at kfiacchi@syr.edu.


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Center for Policy Research
426 Eggers Hall